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This Week On The Space Show

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Apr 9, 2018 4:09 am
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The Space Show, hosted by David Livingston at www.TheSpaceShow.com, will have the following guests this week:

1. Monday, April 9, 2018, 2-3:30 PM PDT (21-22:30 GMT)
Advanced and creative space possibilities with Dr. Geoffrey Landis of NASA.

www.TheSpaceShow.com

www.TheSpaceShow.com


Geoffrey A. Landis is a scientist and a science-fiction writer.
As a writer, he is the author of eighty published short stories and novelettes, and just under fifty poems. His novel Mars Crossing appeared from Tor Books, and a short story collection Impact Parameter (and other quantum realities) from Golden Gryphon.

In 1990 his story “Ripples in the Dirac Sea” won the Nebula award for best short story; in 1992 his short story “A Walk in the Sun” won the Hugo award. (Now available on audiotape), and in 2003 his short story “Falling Onto Mars” won the Hugo. His novel Mars Crossing won the Locus Award for best first novel of 2000. In 2014, he won the Robert A. Heinlein award “for outstanding published works in science fiction and technical writings to inspire the human exploration of space.”
His work has been translated into twenty-one languages, and the Portugese translation of “Ripples in the Dirac Sea” won the Brazilian Reader’s Poll award for best short story. His collection Myths, Legends, and True History was published in 1991 by Pulphouse as part of their Author’s Choice Monthly series (now, unfortunately, out of print.)

Aside from writing, Dr. Landis is a scientist with the N.A.S.A. John Glenn Research Center. From 2005-2006, he was the Ronald E. McNair-NASA Visiting Professor of Astronautics at M.I.T.. In 2013, he was awarded the AIAA Aerospace Power Systems Award for “developing advanced photovoltaic power systems for extreme space environments; providing leadership, fostering innovation, interfacing with the public; and contributing to an improved scientific understanding of operating solar power devices from the solar corona to the Martian surface and beyond.”

He has published 400 scientific papers in the fields of photovoltaics and astronautics, holds eight patents on photovoltaic device designs, has written dozens of articles about model rocket technology and edited several MIT Rocket Society reports, many of which can still be purchased from the NAR. He’s written more technical reports that he really wants to think about, and organized and served as the technical chairman of the Vision-21 symposium (cover art). He has flown the human-powered airplane “Chrysalis” and helped build both Chrysalis and also the prize-winning Monarch airplanes. He was involved in a project called SpaceCub to design a personal rocket for the hobby flyer. He was a regular participant in the Science Fiction Age “Science Forum”, and has written 12 popular science articles, including “The Demon Under Hawaii,” Analog, July 1992, winner of the AnLab reader’s award for best science article. He has undergraduate degrees in physics and electrical engineering from MIT and received his PhD in solid-state physics from Brown University.

He has worked on a number of space missions. Some of the more notable of these include: ◦He was a member of the Sojourner Rover team on the successful Mars Pathfinder mission in 1997

He is currently a member  of the science team on the long-lived Mars Exploration Rovers Mission, making spectacular discoveries while driving the rovers “Spirit” and “Opportunity” around on the surface of Mars.

2. Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 7-8:30 PM PDT (April 11, 2-3:30 GMT)
Space updates with Casey Dreier of The Planetary Society.

As Director of Space Policy, Casey leads the strategic planning and implementation of the Society’s policy and advocacy efforts. He works closely with the Society’s leadership, the Board of Directors, and other policy experts to craft the organizational positions about the future of space exploration. He also works to foster strong relationships between the Society and its members, educate and engage the public about space policy, and to empower individuals to advocate for space.  He is a regular contributor to The Planetary Report, blogs regularly about space policy issues. He has a B.A. in Physics from Oberlin College.

3. Friday, April 13, 2018, 9:30-11 AM PDT (16:30-18 GMT)
“The Cosmic Zoo” and more with Dr. Dirk Schulze-Makuch.

Dirk Schulze-Makuch is a professor at the Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at the Technical University Berlin, Germany. He is best known for his publications on extraterrestrial life, being coauthor of five books on the topic: The Cosmic Zoo: Complex Life on Many Worlds (2017), A One Way Mission to Mars: Colonizing the Red Planet (2011), We Are Not Alone: Why We Have Already Found Extraterrestrial Life (2010), Cosmic Biology: How Life could Evolve on Other Worlds (2010), and Life in the Universe: Expectations and Constraints (2004, 2008). In 2012 he published with David Darling Megacatastrophes! Nine Strange Ways the World Could End. In 2013 he published the second edition of his science fiction novel Alien Encounter. Together with Paul Davies he proposed in 2010 exploration of Mars by a one-way trip to the planet.

4. Sunday, April 15, 2018, 12-1:30 PM PDT (19-20:30 GMT)
Chasing New Horizons with Dr. Alan Stern.

Dr. Alan Stern is a planetary scientist, space program executive, consultant, and author. He is serving as an Associate Vice President at the Southwest Research Institute and has his own aerospace consulting firm, with current and former clients including Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin, Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, the Odyssey Moon Google Lunar X-Prize team, Boeing Aerospace, and the Johns Hopkins University. In 2007 and 2008, Dr. Stern served as NASA’s chief of all space and Earth science programs, directing a $4.4B organization with 93 separate flight missions and a program of over 3,000 research grants. During his NASA tenure, a record 10 major new flight projects were started and deep reforms of NASA’s scientific research and the education and public outreach programs were put in place. His tenure also featured an emphasis on cost control in NASA flight missions that resulted in a 63% decrease in cost overruns. In 2007, he was named to the Time 100’s list of most influential people. His career has taken him to numerous astronomical observatories, to the South Pole, and to the upper atmosphere aboard various high performance NASA aircraft including F/A-18 Hornets, KC-135 zero-G, and WB-57 Canberras. He has been involved as a researcher in 24 suborbital, orbital, and planetary space missions, including 9 for which he was the mission principle investigator; and he has led the development of 8 ultraviolet and visible/infrared scientific instruments for NASA space missions. Among Dr. Stern’s mission lead roles is NASA’s $720M New Horizon’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt mission, the largest PI-led space mission ever launched by NASA. Prior to his service at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Dr. Stern served as the Executive Director of the Southwest Research Institute’s (SwRI’s) Space Science and Engineering Division from 2005-2007. Previous to that, from 1998 to 2005, he was the Director of the Space Studies Department at SwRI, and from 1994 to 1998, he was from 1994-1998 the leader of the Geophysical, Astrophysical, and Planetary Science section in SwRI’s Space Sciences Department. During his SwRI tenure from 1991 to 2007, Dr. Stern grew SwRI’s planetary group from three people to one of the largest in the world, with a total project value exceeding $250M. Prior to founding SwRI’s Colorado operations in 1994, he was the leader of SwRI’s Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences group at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. From 1983 to 1991 he held positions at the University of Colorado in the Center for Space and Geosciences Policy, the office of the Vice President for Research, the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA). Before receiving his doctorate from the University of Colorado in 1989, Dr. Stern completed twin master’s degrees in aerospace engineering and atmospheric sciences (1980 and 1981), and then spent six years as an aerospace systems engineer, concentrating on spacecraft and payload systems at the NASA Johnson Space Center, Martin Marietta Aerospace, and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. His two undergraduate degrees are in physics and astronomy from the University of Texas (1978 and 1980). Dr. Stern has published over 200 technical papers and 40 popular articles. He has given over 300 technical talks and over 100 popular lectures and speeches about astronomy and the space program. He has written two books, The U.S. Space Program After Challenger (Franklin-Watts, 1987), and Pluto and Charon: Ice Worlds on the Ragged Edge of the Solar System (Wiley 1997, 2005). Additionally, he has served as editor on three technical volumes, and three collections of scientific popularizations: Our Worlds (Cambridge, 1998), Our Universe (Cambridge, 2000), and Worlds Beyond (Cambridge, 2003). Dr. Stern’s research has focused on studies of our solar system’s Kuiper belt and Oort cloud, comets, the satellites of the outer planets, the Pluto system, and the search for evidence of solar systems around other stars. He has also worked on spacecraft rendezvous theory, terrestrial polar mesospheric clouds, galactic astrophysics, and studies of tenuous satellite atmospheres, including the atmosphere of the moon. Dr. Stern has served on numerous NASA advisory committees, including the Lunar Exploration Science Working Group and the Discovery Program Science Working Group, the Solar System Exploration Subcommittee (SSES), the New Millennium Science Working Group, the Pluto Science Definition Team (SDT), and NASA’s Sounding Rocket Working Group. He was chairman of NASA’s Outer Planets Science Working Group from 1991 to 1994. He served as a panel member for the National Research Council’s 2003-2013 decadal survey on planetary science, and on the NASA Advisory Council (2006-2007). He is currently serving as the chair of the Suborbital Applications Researcher’s Group (SARG) of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation (CSF). Dr. Stern is a fellow of the AAAS and the IAA, and a member of the AAS and the AGU; he w as elected incoming chair of the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences in 2006. He has been awarded the Von Braun Aerospace Achievement Award of the National Space Society, the 2007 University of Colorado George Norlin Distinguished Alumnus Award, and the 2009 St. Mark’s Preparatory School Distinguished Alumnus Award. He is a member of the board of directors of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Dr. Stern’s personal interests include hiking, camping, and writing. He is an instrument-rated commercial pilot and flight instructor, with both powered and sailplane ratings.

You can listen to the shows under www.TheSpaceShow.com
Source and copyright by The Space Show.

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