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Supermoon and Space Station

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:57 am via: NASA
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What are those specks in front of the Moon? They are silhouettes of the International Space Station (ISS). Using careful planning and split-second timing, a meticulous lunar photographer captured ten images of the ISS passing in front of last month’s full moon. But this wasn’t just any full moon — this was the first of the three consecutive 2016 supermoons. A supermoon is a full moon that appears a few percent larger and brighter than most other full moons.

The featured image sequence was captured near Dallas, Texas. Occurring today is the second supermoon of this series, a full moon that is the biggest and brightest not only of the year, but of any year since 1948. To see today’s super-supermoon yourself, just go outside at night and look up. The third supermoon of this year’s series will occur in mid-December.

Image Credit & Copyright: Kris Smith

Image Credit & Copyright: Kris Smith

3 Comments
The super moon is the evidence of bright and a big star ever since year 1948,it can be seen anywhere and is closer to the Earth.
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