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Super Moon vs. Micro Moon

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Sep 8, 2014 9:05 am via: NASA
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What is so super about tomorrow’s supermoon? Tomorrow, a full moon will occur that appears slightly larger and brighter than usual. The reason is that the Moon’s fully illuminated phase occurs within a short time from perigee – when the Moon is its closest to the Earth in its elliptical orbit.

Although the precise conditions that define a supermoon vary, given one definition, tomorrow’s will be the third supermoon of the year — and the third consecutive month that a supermoon occurs. One reason supermoons are popular is because they are so easy to see — just go outside and sunset and watch an impressive full moon rise!

Image Credit & Copyright: Catalin Paduraru

Image Credit & Copyright: Catalin Paduraru

Since perigee actually occurs today, tonight’s sunset moonrise should also be impressive. Pictured above, a supermoon from 2012 is compared to a micromoon — when a full Moon occurs near the furthest part of the Moon’s orbit — so that it appears smaller and dimmer than usual. Given many definitions, at least one supermoon occurs each year, with the next being 2015 August 30.

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