Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for Upcoming Shuttle Visit

Station Crew Prepares for Upcoming Shuttle Visit

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Jul 10, 2009 6:57 am
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – As the Expedition 20 crew members gear up for a visit by space shuttle Endeavour, they tackled a variety of science experiments and maintenance activities aboard the International Space Station Thursday.

Endeavour and the STS-127 crew are scheduled to launch to the station Saturday, bringing with them the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility and Experiment Logistics Module Exposed Section. They also will bring astronaut Timothy Kopra, who will take Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata’s place aboard the station.

Big Thompson Mesa in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Big Thompson Mesa in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Five spacewalks are planned for the STS-127 crew after the shuttle docks with the station early next week for 11 days of joint operations.

Commander Gennady Padalka assisted Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko with a biomedical experiment designed to test visual response to various typographic stimuli in the microgravity environment aboard the station.

Padalka also performed maintenance duties and monitored ongoing science experiments in the Zvezda service module.

Wakata and Flight Engineer Bob Thirsk took water samples from the Water Recovery System (WRS) and tested them using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer. The WRS recycles wastewater into drinkable water. The tests showed that the water is safe and healthy to drink.

Wakata also worked in the Kibo laboratory to prepare its robotic arm for use during the STS-127 mission. Kibo’s robotic arm will be instrumental in the installation of payloads on the new Exposed Facility to be mated to the back porch of the Japanese laboratory.

Flight Engineer Mike Barratt wrapped up four days of work adjusting the manual flow control valves for the internal thermal control systems in the U.S. segment of the station. He also took swab samples of the station’s environment for analysis with the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) system.

Flight Engineer Frank De Winne worked in the Columbus laboratory conducting science experiments and maintenance work.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use