Headlines > News > More Astronaut Eye Checks While Life Science Work and Plumbing Continue

More Astronaut Eye Checks While Life Science Work and Plumbing Continue

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Jul 2, 2014 5:10 pm via: NASA
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Commander Steve Swanson continued his role this week as the International Space Station’s maintenance man and plumber replacing parts inside the Tranquility node’s Waste and Hygiene Compartment. After a few hours of that work he inspected and photographed the parts for possible blockages preventing a pump from dosing the correct amount of water in the station’s toilet.

Swanson began his day setting up software and hardware for eye exams using an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) laptop computer. Fellow astronauts Reid Wiseman and Alexander Gerst then conducted their own vision checks using the OCT gear with remote guidance from ground personnel.

Tropical Storm Arthur was pictured early on July 2, 2014, churning in Atlantic waters off the coast of Florida and slowly moving northward.

Tropical Storm Arthur was pictured early on July 2, 2014, churning in Atlantic waters off the coast of Florida and slowly moving northward.

Wiseman then worked throughout the day on a combustion experiment using the Destiny laboratory’s Microgravity Science Glovebox. The Burning and Suppression of Solids study (BASS) observes the geometry of flames burning on various materials in microgravity and explores ways of suppressing the flames. Results may provide scientists with better solutions to detect and put out fires on Earth and in spacecraft as well as provide better models for combustion processes.

Gerst, from the European Space Agency (ESA), worked in the Japanese Kibo laboratory module on science hardware maintenance. He removed a microscope from a Multipurpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR), disconnected its cables and disassembled the device for stowage. The MSPR provides a facility for different types of experiment operations inside Kibo.

At the end of their day, both NASA astronauts along with ESA’s astronaut conducted a final eye exam for the Ocular Health study. The trio dilated their eyes with assistance from Wiseman and used a Fundoscope with guidance from mission doctors to examine the interior of their eyes.

The three cosmonauts were busy in the Russian segment of the orbital laboratory. The trio worked on their set of international science and station upkeep tasks throughout Wednesday.

Veteran station resident Alexander Skvortsov began his work day drawing blood and saliva samples for the Chromatomass microbiology study. After that he tagged up with ground specialists for the Motocard study which observes how a crew member moves around in space. Results will help mission controllers recommend training and corrections for future crew members. Skvortsov then worked throughout the afternoon on Russian maintenance tasks.

Artemyev worked during the morning on the Splanh gastrointestinal study which explores how a crew member’s digestive system adapts to weightlessness. He also had time before lunch to join Skvortsov for the Motocard crew mobility experiment.

Flight Engineer Max Suraev set up the Rassvet mini-research module for work on the Kulonovskiy Kristall physics experiment during his morning. The long-running study observes charged particles trapped in a magnetic field of the microgravity environment. During the afternoon, he inspected and photographed windows inside the Zvezda service module for downlink and analysis on the ground.

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