Headlines > News > Station Crew Works Med Science While Prepping for June 19 Spacewalk

Station Crew Works Med Science While Prepping for June 19 Spacewalk

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Jun 4, 2014 6:58 pm via: NASA
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The six-member Expedition 40 crew participated in medical science experiments while preparing for a June 19 Russian spacewalk. A new laser technology experiment is about to begin tests while Orbital Sciences is gearing up for its upcoming Cygnus cargo craft launch.

Commander Steve Swanson worked throughout the day on botany science, medical science and maintenance work. He set up a camera for the Resist Tubule study which observes gravity resistance in plants.

NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, works with equipment in the airlock in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. The JEM Robotic Maneuvering System Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (JEMRMS MPEP) is visible in the airlock.

NASA astronaut Steve Swanson, Expedition 40 commander, works with equipment in the airlock in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. The JEM Robotic Maneuvering System Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (JEMRMS MPEP) is visible in the airlock.

He also worked with Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman using an ultrasound for eye scans. He then joined European astronaut Alexander Gerst for blood pressure measurements and heart scans. Scientists are using the research data to explore why some astronauts are returning home with diminished sight after long-duration missions.

Swanson also performed some plumbing work in the Waste and Hygiene Compartment, the station’s restroom located in the Harmony node. He later installed an antenna cable on a U.S. spacesuit.

Wiseman opened the Fluids Integrated Rack in the morning for work with the Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE). He configured the Light Microscopy Module for the ACE fluids physics study which observes microscopic particles suspended in liquids.

Gerst continued more prep work for the upcoming Orbital-2 mission due for launch aboard a Cygnus commercial space freighter no earlier than June 20. He was inside the Kibo lab module assembling Cygnus hardware command panel power and data cables.

The Russian Soyuz 39 spacecraft (foreground) and Progress 55 spacecraft and docked to the International Space Station.

The Russian Soyuz 39 spacecraft (foreground) and Progress 55 spacecraft and docked to the International Space Station.

Gerst also spent a few moments collecting samples for the Microbiome study. That experiment observes how microbes that live on a crew member adapt to long-term microgravity.

Flight Engineers Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev are scheduled to exit the International Space Station for a June 19 spacewalk. The cosmonauts will float out of the Pirs docking compartment for a series of installation tasks outside the station’s Russian segment.

They spent Wednesday morning reviewing a preliminary spacewalk timeline and watching an instructional DVD. Skvortsov and Artemyev were joined by spacewalk specialists on the ground for a conference.

After the spacewalk conference, Artemyev monitored urine transfers from the station’s U.S. segment to a docked Progress spacecraft. Skvortsov worked Russian hardware maintenance.

Flight Engineer and veteran station resident Max Suraev started his morning collecting blood and saliva samples for the Russian Chromatomass study. He then measured his arterial blood pressure. In the afternoon Suraev continued more maintenance work amidst his station orientation and familiarization tasks.

The OPALS payload delivered in April aboard the SpaceX Dragon commercial craft is scheduled to begin tests Thursday. The technology experiment installed on the outside of the space station will test using lasers, rather than radio waves, to transmit data down to Earth.

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