Headlines > News > Lyrids in Southern Skies

Lyrids in Southern Skies

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Apr 24, 2014 7:13 am via: NASA
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

Earth’s annual Lyrid meteor shower peaked before dawn on April 22nd, as our fair planet plowed through dust from the tail of long-period comet Thatcher. Even in the dry and dark Atacama desert along Chile’s Pacific coast, light from a last quarter Moon made the night sky bright, washing out fainter meteor streaks.

But brighter Lyrid meteors still put on a show. Captured in this composited earth-and-sky view recorded during early morning hours, the meteors stream away from the shower’s radiant near Vega, alpha star of the constellation Lyra. The radiant effect is due to perspective as the parallel meteor tracks appear to converge in the distance. Rich starfields and dust clouds of our own Milky Way galaxy stretch across the background.

Image Credit & Copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)

Image Credit & Copyright: Yuri Beletsky (Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institution)

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use