Headlines > News > 2012 VP113: A New Furthest Known Object in Solar System

2012 VP113: A New Furthest Known Object in Solar System

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:17 am via: NASA
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

What is the furthest known object in our Solar System? The new answer is 2012 VP113, an object currently over twice the distance of Pluto from the Sun. Pictured above is a series of discovery images taken with the Dark Energy Camera attached to the NOAO’s Blanco 4-meter Telescope in Chile in 2012 and released last week.

The distant object, seen moving on the lower right, is thought to be a dwarf planet like Pluto. Previously, the furthest known dwarf planet was Sedna, discovered in 2003. Given how little of the sky was searched, it is likely that as many as 1,000 more objects like 2012 VP113 exist in the outer Solar System.

Image Credit: S. S. Sheppard (CIS) & C. Trujillo (Gemini Obs.), NOAO

Image Credit: S. S. Sheppard (CIS) & C. Trujillo (Gemini Obs.), NOAO

2012 VP113 is currently near its closest approach to the Sun, in about 2,000 years it will be over five times further. Some scientists hypothesize that the reason why objects like Sedna and 2012 VP113 have their present orbits is because they were gravitationally scattered there by a much larger object — possibly a very distant undiscovered planet.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use