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Biomedical Research, Robotics and Post-Spacewalk Ops For Crew

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:15 pm via: NASA
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The Expedition 36 crew members living and working aboard the International Space Station worked with biomedical research experiments and Robonaut Thursday as they continue to return the Russian segment of the orbiting laboratory to its pre-spacewalk configuration.

Flight Engineers Karen Nyberg and Luca Parmitano used the Ultrasound 2 equipment to perform cardiac scans and blood pressure measurements as part of the ongoing Occular Heath study. Nyberg and Parmitano, along with Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy, also performed ultrasound eye scans to help medical ground support teams study the effect of microgravity on sight.

One of the Expedition 36 crew members captured this oblique nighttime image of a large part of the state of Texas. Credit: NASA

One of the Expedition 36 crew members captured this oblique nighttime image of a large part of the state of Texas. Credit: NASA

Parmitano assembled and powered up Robonaut for another round of ground-commanded tests for the first humanoid robot in space. Robonaut was designed with the intention of eventually taking over tasks deemed too dangerous or mundane for astronauts and even venturing outside the complex someday to assist spacewalkers.

Cassidy and Nyberg continued the transfer of cargo from the European Space Agency’s Automated Transfer Vehicle-4 (ATV-4). Also known as the “Albert Einstein,” ATV-4 delivered 7.3 tons of science experiments and supplies for the crew when it docked with the station’s Zvezda service module on June 15.

After performing a successful spacewalk on Monday, Flight Engineers Fyodor Yurchikhin and Alexander Misurkin focused on returning the Pirs docking compartment to its pre-spacewalk configuration. Their next spacewalk is currently set for mid-August.

Commander Pavel Vinogradov photographed and inspected the windows in the Russian segment of the station and worked on a variety of other maintenance duties. He also worked with the Vzaimodeistviye experiment which explores the interactions of crew members during long-duration missions.

Misurkin also had some time scheduled to collect data on the Matryoshka experiment. Named for the traditional set of Russian nesting dolls, Matryoshka analyzes the radiation environment onboard the station.

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