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This Week On The Space Show

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Mar 18, 2013 8:01 am
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The Space Show, hosted by David Livingston under www.TheSpaceShow.com, will have the following guests this week:

1. Monday, March 18, 2013, 2-3:30 PM PDT (21-22:30 GMT)
DR. CLAUDE PIANTADOSI
comes to discuss his book, “Mankind Beyond Earth: The History, Science, and Future of Human Space Exploration.” See www.amazon.com/Mankind-Beyond-Earth-History-Exploration/dp/0231162421/refonegianlea20.
Dr. Piantadosi is Professor of Medicine and Pathology at Duke University School of Medicine.

www.TheSpaceShow.com

www.TheSpaceShow.com

His laboratory has internationally recognized expertise in the molecular regulatory mechanisms of the physiological gases— nitric oxide and carbon monoxide— in health and disease, particularly the impact of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) on the pathogenesis of acute organ failure in critical illness involving the lungs, liver, and heart, with an emphasis on mechanisms of mitochondrial damage, intrinsic apoptosis, and mitochondrial biogenesis. The laboratory utilizes physiology, biochemistry, light and electron microscopy, and cell and molecular biology to provide a comprehensive understanding of the integrated response to acute inflammatory stressors, especially in animal models of severe sepsis and lung injury. The goals are to understand protective and adaptive molecular responses involving energy metabolism by elucidating relevant redox-regulated signaling and transcriptional control mechanisms as well as by designing and testing molecular interventions to prevent or modulate oxidative and nitrosative stress. The contributions of the laboratory have been to improve our understanding and interpretation of the effects of inflammatory stress on cell metabolism and especially mitochondrial biogenesis as they relate to changes in organ structure and function. The comprehensive approach improves the depth of understanding of integrated redox control mechanisms in organ failure and recovery through both native mechanisms and pharmacological manipulation.

2. Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 7-8:30 PM PDT (March 13, 2-3:30 GMT)
JOHN STRICKLAND
returns for the second part of his space discussion as continued from his Jan. 22, 2013 Space Show appearance.
Mr. Strickland has been an active member of space- and science-related organizations since 1961, when he joined the American Rocket Society as a student member. In 1975 he joined both the National Space Institute and the L-5 Society — the “parents” of NSS. He was the founder of the Austin Space Frontier Society and has served as its chairman from 1981 to the present. He created the Robert A. Heinlein Memorial Award for the National Space Society in 1988, (shortly after the author’s death), and has managed the award from its inception. He also works on the design and production of the Von Braun Award. In 1988, Mr. Strickland was a founder of the NSS Chapters Assembly, and served as one of its officers. His involvement with both Austin environmental groups and CSICOP — a national group working for better science coverage and less pseudo-science in the mass media — has given him a unique perspective on such controversial issues as energy vs. environment. Since 1976, Mr. Strickland has produced articles for “The Humanist,” “L5 News,” “Ad Astra,” “Space News,” “Solar Power,” and other local and regional publications. His articles have focused primarily on national space policy, access to space and space solar power. His creation of a slide show and talk in 1990, explaining and promoting space solar power to non-technical audiences, led to the publication of his first technical SPS article in 1995, and a second in 1996. He served as the director for science and space programming (about 50 events) at the 1997 LoneStarCon World Science Fiction Convention. He contributed a comprehensive chapter on energy systems in the book, “Solar Power Satellites – a Space Energy System for Earth,” edited by Dr. Peter Glaser et al., and published by Wiley-Praxis in 1998. He since has contributed several additional technical papers and presentations to the Mars Society’s 1999 convention, the Wireless Power Transmission Conference of 2001 and the World Space Congress in 2002. He is a director of the Sunsat Energy Council. He has also been a moderate Delegate to the Texas State Republican Convention in 2000, 2002, and 2004, where he facilitated the inclusion of pro-space items into the state platform. Mr. Strickland lived for 30 years in western New York before moving to Austin, Texas in 1976. He received a B. A. in Anthropology with a minor in Biology from SUNY at Buffalo in 1967, and a second B.A. in Computer Science from St. Edwards University in Austin in 1986. He also earned graduate credits in both Anthropology and Biology. He has been a professional programmer and analyst since 1980, and has been employed as a Senior Programmer/Analyst for the State of Texas in Austin since July, 1989.

3. Sunday, March 24, 2013, 12-1:30 PM PDT (19-20:30 GMT)
DR. ALAN STERN
returns to discuss Golden Spike with us. Dr. Stern is with us for the first hour only so if you want to call and talk with him, do so early. The last segment will be an OL discussion about the program and other things on your mind.
Dr. Alan Stern is a planetary scientist, space program executive, consultant, and author. He is serving as an Associate Vice President at the Southwest Research Institute and has his own aerospace consulting firm, with current and former clients including Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin, Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, the Odyssey Moon Google Lunar X-Prize team, Boeing Aerospace, and the Johns Hopkins University. In 2007 and 2008, Dr. Stern served as NASA’s chief of all space and Earth science programs, directing a $4.4B organization with 93 separate flight missions and a program of over 3,000 research grants. During his NASA tenure, a record 10 major new flight projects were started and deep reforms of NASA’s scientific research and the education and public outreach programs were put in place. His tenure also featured an emphasis on cost control in NASA flight missions that resulted in a 63% decrease in cost overruns. In 2007, he was named to the Time 100’s list of most influential people. His career has taken him to numerous astronomical observatories, to the South Pole, and to the upper atmosphere aboard various high performance NASA aircraft including F/A-18 Hornets, KC-135 zero-G, and WB-57 Canberras. He has been involved as a researcher in 24 suborbital, orbital, and planetary space missions, including 9 for which he was the mission principle investigator; and he has led the development of 8 ultraviolet and visible/infrared scientific instruments for NASA space missions. Among Dr. Stern’s mission lead roles is NASA’s $720M New Horizon’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt mission, the largest PI-led space mission ever launched by NASA. Prior to his service at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Dr. Stern served as the Executive Director of the Southwest Research Institute’s (SwRI’s) Space Science and Engineering Division from 2005-2007. Previous to that, from 1998 to 2005, he was the Director of the Space Studies Department at SwRI, and from 1994 to 1998, he was from 1994-1998 the leader of the Geophysical, Astrophysical, and Planetary Science section in SwRI’s Space Sciences Department. During his SwRI tenure from 1991 to 2007, Dr. Stern grew SwRI’s planetary group from three people to one of the largest in the world, with a total project value exceeding $250M. Prior to founding SwRI’s Colorado operations in 1994, he was the leader of SwRI’s Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences group at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. From 1983 to 1991 he held positions at the University of Colorado in the Center for Space and Geosciences Policy, the office of the Vice President for Research, the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA). Before receiving his doctorate from the University of Colorado in 1989, Dr. Stern completed twin master’s degrees in aerospace engineering and atmospheric sciences (1980 and 1981), and then spent six years as an aerospace systems engineer, concentrating on spacecraft and payload systems at the NASA Johnson Space Center, Martin Marietta Aerospace, and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. His two undergraduate degrees are in physics and astronomy from the University of Texas (1978 and 1980). Dr. Stern has published over 200 technical papers and 40 popular articles. He has given over 300 technical talks and over 100 popular lectures and speeches about astronomy and the space program. He has written two books, The U.S. Space Program After Challenger (Franklin-Watts, 1987), and Pluto and Charon: Ice Worlds on the Ragged Edge of the Solar System (Wiley 1997, 2005). Additionally, he has served as editor on three technical volumes, and three collections of scientific popularizations: Our Worlds (Cambridge, 1998), Our Universe (Cambridge, 2000), and Worlds Beyond (Cambridge, 2003). Dr. Stern’s research has focused on studies of our solar system’s Kuiper belt and Oort cloud, comets, the satellites of the outer planets, the Pluto system, and the search for evidence of solar systems around other stars. He has also worked on spacecraft rendezvous theory, terrestrial polar mesospheric clouds, galactic astrophysics, and studies of tenuous satellite atmospheres, including the atmosphere of the moon. Dr. Stern has served on numerous NASA advisory committees, including the Lunar Exploration Science Working Group and the Discovery Program Science Working Group, the Solar System Exploration Subcommittee (SSES), the New Millennium Science Working Group, the Pluto Science Definition Team (SDT), and NASA’s Sounding Rocket Working Group. He was chairman of NASA’s Outer Planets Science Working Group from 1991 to 1994. He served as a panel member for the National Research Council’s 2003-2013 decadal survey on planetary science, and on the NASA Advisory Council (2006-2007). He is currently serving as the chair of the Suborbital Applications Researcher’s Group (SARG) of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation (CSF). Dr. Stern is a fellow of the AAAS and the IAA, and a member of the AAS and the AGU; he w as elected incoming chair of the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences in 2006. He has been awarded the Von Braun Aerospace Achievement Award of the National Space Society, the 2007 University of Colorado George Norlin Distinguished Alumnus Award, and the 2009 St. Mark’s Preparatory School Distinguished Alumnus Award. He is a member of the board of directors of the Challenger Center for Space Science Education. Dr. Stern’s personal interests include hiking, camping, and writing. He is an instrument-rated commercial pilot and flight instructor, with both powered and sailplane ratings.

You can listen to the shows under www.TheSpaceShow.com
Source and copyright by The Space Show.

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