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This Week On The Space Show

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Jan 21, 2013 7:39 am
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The Space Show, hosted by David Livingston under www.TheSpaceShow.com, will have the following guests this week:

1. Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 7-8:30 PM PST (January 23, 3-4:30 GMT)
JOHN STRICKLAND
comes to discuss Cis-lunar space and much more. Please check The Space Show blog Monday evening as Mr. Livingston will be uploading several images John has provided that are relevant for the  Tuesday evening discussion. http://thespaceshow.wordpress.com

www.TheSpaceShow.com

www.TheSpaceShow.com

Mr. Strickland has been an active member of space- and science-related organizations since 1961, when he joined the American Rocket Society as a student member. In 1975 he joined both the National Space Institute and the L-5 Society — the “parents” of NSS. He was the founder of the Austin Space Frontier Society and has served as its chairman from 1981 to the present. He created the Robert A. Heinlein Memorial Award for the National Space Society in 1988, (shortly after the author’s death), and has managed the award from its inception. He also works on the design and production of the Von Braun Award.  In 1988, Mr. Strickland was a founder of the NSS Chapters Assembly, and served as one of its officers. His involvement with both Austin environmental groups and CSICOP — a national group working for better science coverage and less pseudo-science in the mass media — has given him a unique perspective on such controversial issues as energy vs. environment.  Since 1976, Mr. Strickland has produced articles for “The Humanist,” “L5 News,” “Ad Astra,” “Space News,” “Solar Power,” and other local and regional publications. His articles have focused primarily on national space policy, access to space and space solar power. His creation of a slide show and talk in 1990, explaining and promoting space solar power to non-technical audiences, led to the publication of his first technical SPS article in 1995, and a second in 1996.  He served as the director for science and space programming (about 50 events) at the 1997 LoneStarCon World Science Fiction Convention. He contributed a comprehensive chapter on energy systems in the book, “Solar Power Satellites – a Space Energy System for Earth,” edited by Dr. Peter Glaser et al., and published by Wiley-Praxis in 1998. He since has contributed several additional technical papers and presentations to the Mars Society’s 1999 convention, the Wireless Power Transmission Conference of 2001 and the World Space Congress in 2002. He is a director of the Sunsat Energy Council. He has also been a moderate Delegate to the Texas State Republican Convention in 2000, 2002, and 2004, where he facilitated the inclusion of pro-space items into the state platform.  Mr. Strickland lived for 30 years in western New York before moving to Austin, Texas in 1976. He received a B. A. in Anthropology with a minor in Biology from SUNY at Buffalo in 1967, and a second B.A. in Computer Science from St. Edwards University in Austin in 1986. He also earned graduate credits in both Anthropology and Biology. He has been a professional programmer and analyst since 1980, and has been employed as a Senior Programmer/Analyst for the State of Texas in Austin since July, 1989.

2. Friday, January 25, 2013, 9:30-11 AM PST (17:30-19 GMT)
DR. DUANE GRAVELINE
comes to the program. Dr. Graveline is considered the father of NASA microgravity simulation and bed rest studies. Ms. Heather Archuletta joins us as Dr. Livingston’s co-host.

Dr. Duane Graveline is a family doctor, aerospace medical research scientist, USAF flight surgeon and NASA astronaut, Duane Graveline MD MPH was born and raised in Newport, Vermont. He vividly recalls his idyllic life on a dairy farm and his eight years at the nearby one-room school where the same teacher guided him from the alphabet through algebra. Following graduation from the Vermont College of Medicine in 1955, Dr. Graveline interned at the famed Walter Reed Army hospital during the time our space pioneers were just beginning to study the medical effects of space flight. Becoming a flight surgeon and doing space medical research was almost inevitable to this young doctor with stars in his eyes. Soon came the Today show, international recognition for his research on zero gravity deconditioning, his unique position as medical analyst of the Soviet bioastronautics program, assignment as NASA flight controller and finally, in 1965, his selection as NASA scientist astronaut. Graveline still is affiliated with the space program as consultant to the special cosmic radiation hazards to man of “return to the moon and on to Mars.”

Heather Archuletta
was born and raised in San Francisco, and has degrees from Mills College in nearby Oakland, and the University of London, England.  She loves to travel for both jobs and leisure, having lived in 7 US states and visited 47.  After working in the tech industry for 17 years at large corporations like Oracle and Western Digital, she joined a NASA program for space flight simulations, which studies the long-term effects of weightlessness on the human body.  These projects help Johnson Space Center scientists learn more about how to keep astronauts healthy in space for long duration flights, and she now works to find other qualified applicants for the programs.  Her “Pillow Astronaut” blog  (http://pillownaut.blogspot.com), which describes the flight sims in both personal and medical detail, has been featured in Wired, Popular Science and FOX news in America, as well as news outlets in Europe, India, Scandinavia and Russia.

3. Sunday, January 27, 2013, 12-1:30 PM PST (20-21:30 GMT)
DR. ERIK SEEDHOUSE
, author of “Pulling G: Human Responses to High and Low Gravity.”, returns See www.amazon.com/Pulling-Responses-Gravity-Springer-Popular/dp/1461430291/ref=onegiantlea20.
Erik Seedhouse is an aerospace scientist whose ambition has always been to work as an astronaut. After completing his first degree in Sports Science at Northumbria University the author joined the legendary 2nd Battalion the Parachute Regiment, the world’s most elite airborne regiment. During his time in the ‘Para’s’ Erik spent six months in Belize, where he was trained in the art of jungle warfare and conducted several border patrols along the Belize-Guatemala border. Later, he spent several months learning the intricacies of desert warfare on the Akamas Range in Cyprus. He made more than thirty jumps from a Hercules C130 aircraft, performed more than two hundred abseils from a helicopter and fired more light anti-tank weapons than he cares to remember!  Upon returning to the comparatively mundane world of academia, the author embarked upon a Master’s degree in Medical Science at Sheffield University. He supported his master’s degree studies by winning prize money in 100km ultradistance running races. Shortly after placing third in the World 100km Championships in 1992 and setting the North American 100km record, the author turned to ultradistance triathlon, winning the World Endurance Triathlon Championships in 1995 and 1996. For good measure, he also won the inaugural World Double Ironman Championships in 1995 and the infamous Decatriathlon, the world’s longest triathlon, an event requiring competitors to swim 38km, cycle 1800km, and run 422km. Non-stop!  Returning to academia once again in 1996, Erik pursued his Ph.D. at the German Space Agency’s Institute for Space Medicine. While conducting his Ph.D studies he still found time to win Ultraman Hawaii and the European Ultraman Championships as well as completing the Race Across America bike race. Due to his success as the world’s leading ultradistance triathlete Erik was featured in dozens of magazines and television interviews. In 1997, GQ magazine nominated him as the ‘Fittest Man in the World’.  In 1999, Erik decided it was time to get a real job. He retired from being a professional triathlete and started his post-doctoral studies at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University’s School of Kinesiology. While living in Vancouver, Erik gained his pilot’s license, started climbing mountains and took up sky-diving to relax in his spare time. In 2005 the author worked as an astronaut training consultant for Bigelow Aerospace in Las Vegas and wrote ‘Tourists in Space’, a training manual for spaceflight participants. He is a Fellow of the British Interplanetary Society and a member of the Aerospace Medical Association. Recently, he was one of the final thirty candidates of the Canadian Space Agency’s Astronaut Recruitment Campaign. Erik currently works as manned spaceflight consultant and author. He plans to travel into space with one of the private spaceflight companies. As well as being a triathlete, skydiver, pilot and author, Erik is an avid scuba diver and has logged more than two hundred dives in more than twenty countries. His favorite movie is the director’s cut of ‘Blade Runner’, his favorite science fiction authors are Allen Steele and Stanislav Lem and his favorite science fiction series is Red Dwarf. ‘Prepare for Launch’ is his fifth book. When not writing, he spends as much time as possible in Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii and at his real home in Sandefjord, Norway. Erik lives with his wife and two cats on the Niagara Escarpment in Canada.

You can listen to the shows under www.TheSpaceShow.com
Source and copyright by The Space Show.

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