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Science, Cargo Transfers and Emergency Training for Station Crew

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Aug 12, 2011 6:24 am via: NASA
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The Expedition 28 crew members conducted a variety of science experiments, transferred cargo and participated in an emergency depress drill aboard the International Space Station on Thursday.

Flight Engineer Mike Fossum worked with SHERE, or Shear History Extension Rheology Experiment. The experiment investigates the effect of rotation on the stress and strain response of a polymer fluid being stretched in microgravity.

Fossum also worked with the International Space Station Agricultural Camera, or ISSAC. Remotely operated by students and faculty at the University of North Dakota, ISSAC takes frequent images principally of vegetated areas in the northern Great Plains region of the United States as well as dynamic processes around the world, such as melting glaciers, seasonal changes and human impacts.

Commander Andrey Borisenko worked with the RELAXATION experiment, setting up a camera to view the radiation emitted when the station’s propulsion exhaust interacts with the Earth’s atmosphere. He also worked with PNEUMOCARD, an experiment that uses an electrocardiogram and other tools to measure a crew member’s cardiorespiratory system.

Flight Engineer Alexander Samokutyaev spent time with IDENTIFICATION, an experiment that studies the loads placed on the station during spacecraft dockings, reboosts and spacewalks.

Flight Engineer Sergei Volkov transferred unneeded hardware into the ISS Progress 43 craft for disposal when it undocks later this month for a destructive re-entry in Earth’s atmosphere. He also worked with SPRUT-2, which observes the adaption of body fluids in microgravity.

Flight Engineer Ron Garan unpacked gear from the docked ISS Progress 42 cargo craft and took a short break from his duties to speak with students in Italy over ham radio.

Using the Japanese Robotic Manipulator System, Flight Engineer Satoshi Furukawa ungrappled and put away the Small Fine Arm after completing a check out of the system last week.

Working with flight control teams on Earth, the six station crew members participated in a periodic emergency depress drill to maintain readiness for the unlikely event of a station evacuation.

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