Headlines > News > Crew Prepares for Monday Spacewalk, Continues Science

Crew Prepares for Monday Spacewalk, Continues Science

Published by Matt on Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:58 am via: NASA
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Flight Engineers Oleg Skripochka and Fyodor Yurchikhin are preparing their Russian Orlan spacesuits for Monday’s six-hour spacewalk. They are conducting a fit check in advance of a dress rehearsal on Friday. On Monday, the spacewalkers will install a workstation, clean and remove science hardware and investigate the possibility of bio-organisms on the outside of the station.

t 220 miles above Earth, the unattended Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft, docked to the International Space Station, almost appears to be a giant telescope focusing through a break in the clouds upon several islands in the Galapagos chain. Isabela is the most easily recognizable island among this chain in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

t 220 miles above Earth, the unattended Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft, docked to the International Space Station, almost appears to be a giant telescope focusing through a break in the clouds upon several islands in the Galapagos chain. Isabela is the most easily recognizable island among this chain in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Alexander Kaleri worked in the Russian side of the International Space Station. He spent time cleaning filters and conducting an audit of the Inventory Management System.

Commander Doug Wheelock setup and activated the COLBERT treadmill. He videotaped his exercise session and inspected some of the treadmill gear afterwards.

Flight Engineer Shannon Walker was in the Japanese Kibo Laboratory participating in the BIORHYTHM science experiment. BIORHYTHM measures a crew member’s cardiac activity during long duration stays in space. The research came about after demonstrations showed lack of an earth-bound circadian rhythm can disrupt sleep patterns and adversely affect cardiovascular functions.

Flight Engineer Scott Kelly setup the Capillary Flow Experiment on a maintenance work area and recorded the results with a high-definition video camera. The experiment studies and observes the behavior of fluids in microgravity by tapping, pushing, sliding, swirling, and shaking a special storage container. Benefits include more advanced fluid transfer and storage systems for future spacecraft.

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