Headlines > News > Station Crew Preps for Progress and Shuttle; Station Reboosted

Station Crew Preps for Progress and Shuttle; Station Reboosted

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Oct 22, 2010 5:37 am via: NASA
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The Expedition 25 crew members aboard the International Space Station focused Thursday on preparations for the upcoming departure of a Russian cargo ship and the arrival of two spacecraft over the next two weeks.

The ISS Progress 37 cargo craft is scheduled to undock from the Pirs docking compartment on Monday at 10:25 a.m. EDT. It will spend three weeks orbiting a safe distance from the station to enable Russian engineers to conduct technology experiments before being deorbited Nov. 15.

Flight Engineer Shannon Walker works with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency experiment HydroTropi in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Shannon Walker works with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency experiment HydroTropi in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

To prepare for the arrival of the ISS Progress 40 cargo craft Oct. 30, Flight Engineers Alexander Kaleri and Oleg Skripochka conducted a communications test of TORU, the Russian telerobotically operated rendezvous system. The crew can use TORU to monitor the docking of a Progress cargo craft with the station or take control of the process if difficulties arise.

In advance of the arrival of space shuttle Discovery in November, Commander Doug Wheelock and Flight Engineers Scott Kelly and Shannon Walker participated in a planning conference with the STS-133 crew members and flight controllers on Earth to review mission operations.

During Discovery’s final spaceflight, slated to launch Nov. 1, the STS-133 crew members will install the Permanent Multipurpose Module and deliver important spare parts to the station along with the Express Logistics Carrier-4 and Robonaut 2.

Walker continued her work with the Japanese experiment HydroTropi. The botanical experiment takes place in the Kibo laboratory and studies how plants, such as a cucumber, grow at a molecular level in microgravity. Data obtained from the results may lead to significant advancements in agricultural production on Earth.

Working in the Russian segment of the station, Flight Engineer Fyodor Yurchikhin participated in Pilot-M, a Russian biomedical experiment designed to test the response of cosmonauts to the effects of stress factors in flight. This experiment employs a device to track eye movements while the subject pilots a flight simulator on a laptop computer.

Kelly, Kaleri and Skripochka continued ongoing orientation activities to familiarize themselves with their new home. They arrived at the station aboard the Soyuz TMA-01M on Oct. 9.

The docked ISS Progress 39 cargo craft fired its engines at 3:41 p.m. Wednesday boosting the station to the correct altitude for the upcoming docking of the ISS Progress 40 cargo craft and the arrival of space shuttle Discovery.

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