Headlines > News > ISS Progress 39 Launch Postponed

ISS Progress 39 Launch Postponed

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Sep 9, 2010 6:40 am via: NASA
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The launch of the ISS Progress 39 cargo craft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan was postponed for 48 hours Wednesday due to high winds at the launch pad. The launch of the spacecraft was rescheduled for Friday at 6:22 a.m. EDT. Docking to the aft port of the Zvezda service module has been rescheduled for Sunday at 7:58 a.m. with NASA TV coverage set to begin at 7:15 a.m.

According to Roscosmos, the upper limit launch commit criteria for winds at the Baikonur launch pad is about 15 meters per second (33 miles an hour). Winds at the Central Asian desert launch site were gusting up to those limits, and the Russian State Commission elected to delay the launch for 48 hours. The postponement will have no impact on station operations.

The central Andes Mountains near the Chile / Argentina border were photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

The central Andes Mountains near the Chile / Argentina border were photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

When it arrives at the International Space Station, the new Progress will deliver 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen, 375 pounds of water and 2,645 pounds of spare parts, experiment hardware and other supplies for the six crew members on board.

Meanwhile aboard the station, Expedition 24 Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko tested the docking systems on the Zvezda module’s aft port for the arrival of ISS Progress 39. Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson tested the Ku-band television system that will monitor the docking.

Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock worked with the Sodium Loading in Microgravity (SOLO) experiment that studies the mechanisms of fluid and salt retention in the body during long-duration spaceflight.

Wheelock also performed maintenance on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), by removing the belt pulley cover to confirm the rope was still routed properly on the pulleys. The ARED uses vacuum cylinders to mimic weightlifting exercises in the microgravity environment of space.

In preparation for their return to Earth aboard the Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft scheduled for Sept. 24, Skvortsov, Kornienko and Caldwell Dyson continued to stow items onto the docked spacecraft.

Throughout the day, the crew had time set aside for Earth observation and photography. The targets for Wednesday included Yerevan, the capital city of Armenia and one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world.

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