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Science and Maintenance for Station Crew

Published by Matt on Thu Sep 2, 2010 9:00 am via: NASA
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As part of the ongoing Russian Seiner experiment, Expedition 24 Commander Alexander Skvortsov photographed and documented developments and conditions in the Earth’s oceans Wednesday. His unique perspective of the oceans provides scientists on the ground with current position coordinates of bioproductive water areas.

Photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station, this is an oblique view that shows the eye (just left of center) of Hurricane Earl. A Russian Soyuz vehicle is docked to the station (foreground). Credit: NASA

Photographed by an Expedition 24 crew member on the International Space Station, this is an oblique view that shows the eye (just left of center) of Hurricane Earl. A Russian Soyuz vehicle is docked to the station (foreground). Credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko worked with the PILOT-M experiment. PILOT-M is an ongoing experiment that examines the effects of long-duration space flight and stress on the ability of crew members to complete manual spacecraft control tasks.

Flight Engineer Shannon Walker set up the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) experiment and performed body mass measurements. SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crew member mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass, in effect weighing the individuals.

Using the Fluid Servicing System, Walker also refilled the Columbus laboratory’s Internal Active Thermal Control System with a water-based coolant.

Flight engineers Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Doug Wheelock and Walker participated in an in-flight interview, answering questions from MSNBC and California State University, Fullerton, where Caldwell Dyson earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry. She went on to earn a doctorate in chemistry at the University of California, Davis.

The targets for Wednesday’s Earth observation and photography were Hurricane Earl in the western Atlantic Ocean and volcanoes in Indonesia.

The ISS Progress 38 cargo craft, loaded with trash and other items for disposal, undocked from the aft end of the station’s Zvezda service module at 7:22 a.m. EDT Tuesday. Russian flight controllers will conduct thruster tests with the Progress to gather engineering data before sending it to a fiery descent Monday over the Pacific Ocean.

Progress 38’s departure clears the aft port of Zvezda for the arrival of the next Russian resupply vehicle, ISS Progress 39, which will launch Sept. 8 at 7:11 a.m. and dock Sept. 10 at 8:40 a.m., delivering 2.5 tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 24 crew.

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