Headlines > News > Cargo Craft Undocks

Cargo Craft Undocks

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Sep 1, 2010 5:55 am via: NASA
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

An unpiloted Russian Progress resupply craft undocked Tuesday from the International Space Station to set the stage for the arrival of a new Progress cargo vehicle on Sept. 10.

The ISS Progress 38 cargo craft, loaded with trash and other items for disposal, undocked from the aft end of the station’s Zvezda service module at 7:22 a.m. EDT. Russian flight controllers will conduct thruster tests with the Progress to gather engineering data before sending it to a fiery descent Monday over the Pacific Ocean.

With the ISS Progress 37 cargo craft and the Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft in the foreground, the International Space Station flies over Hurricane Earl at an altitude of 218 statute miles Monday. Credit: NASA TV

With the ISS Progress 37 cargo craft and the Soyuz TMA-18 spacecraft in the foreground, the International Space Station flies over Hurricane Earl at an altitude of 218 statute miles Monday. Credit: NASA TV

Progress 38’s departure clears the aft port of Zvezda for the arrival of the next Russian resupply vehicle, ISS Progress 39, which will launch Sept. 8 at 7:11 a.m. and dock Sept. 10 at 8:40 a.m., delivering 2.5 tons of food, fuel and supplies for the Expedition 24 crew.

In other activities aboard the orbiting complex Tuesday, the six-member crew participated in a variety of research experiments studying the effects of weightlessness and conducted routine but vital housekeeping tasks.

Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock performed his third session with an experiment that studies changes in the astronauts’ aerobic capacity during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers are interested in tracking these changes because a reduction in maximum oxygen uptake directly affects a crew member’s ability to perform strenuous activities such as spacewalks or emergency operations.

In the European Columbus laboratory, Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson spent some time checking out BioLab, a research facility used to perform space biology experiments. Caldwell Dyson also conducted maintenance on the Recycle Filter Tank Assembly of the station’s Water Recovery System.

As part of the Biological Rhythms study by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Flight Engineer Shannon Walker donned a small device that will record an electrocardiogram for 24 hours. Scientists are examining the adverse effects of long-duration spaceflight such as cardiovascular deconditioning and sleep disturbances, which may be accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms.

Commander Alexander Skvortsov participated in Pneumocard, a Russian experiment that seeks to predict the physical reactions of crew members upon return to Earth.

Meanwhile, Flight Engineer Fyodor Yurchikhin performed maintenance on the environmental and life support systems in the Russian segment of the station, and fellow flight engineer Mikhail Kornienko conducted a camera test to assure good views of the Progress undocking.

As the workday drew to a close, all three Russian crew members participated in a handover briefing to discuss the roles and responsibilities of Expedition 25, which begins with the departure of three crew members aboard the Soyuz TMA-18 in late September.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use