Headlines > News > Station Crew Starts Week with Robotics, Spacewalk Preparations

Station Crew Starts Week with Robotics, Spacewalk Preparations

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Tue Jul 20, 2010 6:41 am via: NASA
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The International Space Station’s Expedition 24 crew began a new week aboard its high-flying home Monday with robotics work and preparations for two upcoming spacewalks.

The complex and novel task of using the Dextre robot to swap out a failed Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) began Monday when Canadarm2 grappled Dextre and maneuvered to the P1 truss worksite. A partial removal and reinstallation demonstration of the failed RPCM is slated for Tuesday, and the actual replacement of the RPCM will take place Wednesday.

Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Shannon Walker uses a vacuum cleaner during housekeeping operations in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Shannon Walker uses a vacuum cleaner during housekeeping operations in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Flight Engineers Mikhail Kornienko and Fyodor Yurchikhin spent time getting ready for the first Expedition 24 spacewalk. The excursion is scheduled to begin the evening of July 26. The cosmonauts will outfit the Rassvet module for a Kurs automated rendezvous system, which will allow unmanned Russian vehicles, such as Progress resupply craft, to dock there.

Additionally, Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock prepared tools for the spacewalk he and Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson will conduct on Aug. 5. They will install a power and data grapple fixture on the Zarya module and a power extension cable on the Unity module in preparation for the delivery of the Permanent Multipurpose Module to the nadir port of Unity on the STS-133 mission in November. Leonardo is at Kennedy Space Center being refitted as a permanent module for the station.

Flight Engineer Shannon Walker worked with the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, a study that tests techniques that could lead to advancements in automated dockings, satellite servicing, spacecraft assembly and emergency repairs.

Commander Alexander Skvortsov took photos for the Russian ocean observation program known as Seiner. The program tests the interaction procedure between the crews of the station’s Russian segment and State Fishery Committee ships during the search and development of fishing productive areas of the world’s oceans.

Researchers can learn more about opportunities to develop and fly science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) at the NASA ISS Research Academy Aug. 3-5 in League City, Texas.

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