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Station Maintenance and Science for Station Crew

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Jul 8, 2010 7:51 am via: NASA
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The six Expedition 24 crew members aboard the International Space Station focused their attention Wednesday on maintenance and science activities.

Flight Engineers Doug Wheelock and Tracy Caldwell Dyson performed maintenance on the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, the component of the Air Revitalization System which scrubs carbon dioxide from the station’s environment.

Flight Engineers Tracy Caldwell Dyson and Doug Wheelock work with the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly in the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Flight Engineers Tracy Caldwell Dyson and Doug Wheelock work with the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly in the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Meanwhile, Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko continued the unloading and inventorying of cargo from the ISS Progress 38 cargo vehicle, which docked to the station at 12:17 pm. EDT Sunday using the Kurs automated rendezvous docking system.

Skvortsov also performed tests on the Russian telerobotically operated rendezvous system, TORU, that experienced a transmitter problem Friday causing the abort of the first docking attempt of the Progress. Analysis of the problem continues by Russian specialists.

Among the many science activities aboard the station, Flight Engineer Shannon Walker worked with the VO2max experiment, which involves recording the oxygen intake of exercising crew members before, during and after their stays aboard the station to evaluate and document the changes in their aerobic capacity.

Caldwell Dyson worked with the Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 experiment, which studies the way that particles of tin suspended in a molten mixture increase in size – a process known as coarsening – without the influence of the Earth’s gravity. This work has direct applications to metal alloy manufacturing on Earth, including materials critical for aerospace applications.

Flight Engineer Fyodor Yurchikhin worked with the Russian experiment known as Relaxation, observing radiation patterns from Earth’s ionosphere.

Skvortsov and Kornienko spent time with the Plasma Crystal-3 Plus experiment, that studies the behavior of electrically-charged dust particles in a space environment.

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