Headlines > News > Docking Preps and Science for Station Crew

Docking Preps and Science for Station Crew

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Jul 2, 2010 6:30 am via: NASA
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

The ISS Progress 38 cargo carrier launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday at 11:35 a.m. EDT loaded with 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 220 pounds of water and 2,667 pounds of equipment, spare parts and experiment hardware for the Expedition 24 crew.

As the Progress made its way to the orbiting complex Thursday, the Expedition 24 crew members made preparations for its arrival and worked with a variety of science experiments.

After inserting biological samples, Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock replaces a dewar tray in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2 (MELFI-2) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

After inserting biological samples, Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock replaces a dewar tray in the Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS-2 (MELFI-2) in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko had a conference with specialists on Earth to review docking procedures for the arrival of the Progress.

The Progress is scheduled to dock to the International Space Station using the automated Kurs docking system at 12:58 p.m. Friday.

To make room for the ISS Progress 38, the Expedition 24 crew relocated the Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft from the aft end of the Zvezda service module to the Rassvet module Monday.

Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock worked with the VO2max experiment, which involves recording the oxygen intake of exercising crew members before, during and after their stays aboard the station to evaluate and document the changes in their aerobic capacity.

Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson worked with the Coarsening in Solid-Liquid Mixtures-2 experiment, which studies the way that particles of tin suspended in a molten tin/lead mixture increase in size – a process known as coarsening – without the influence of the Earth’s gravity. This work has direct applications to metal alloy manufacturing on Earth, including materials critical for aerospace applications.

As the newest Expedition 24 crew members, Flight Engineers Fyodor Yurchikhin, Shannon Walker and Wheelock had some time scheduled for orientation activities to help them adjust to living and working in the weightless environment of the station. The trio arrived at the station on June 17 aboard the Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use