Headlines > News > Station Crew Members Relocate Soyuz

Station Crew Members Relocate Soyuz

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:35 am via: NASA
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In orbit high above the Earth, three members of the International Space Station’s Expedition 24 crew relocated the Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft Monday.

The Soyuz undocked from the aft end of the Zvezda service module at 3:13 p.m. EDT with the newest station crew members – Flight Engineers Fyodor Yurchikhin, Doug Wheelock and Shannon Walker – aboard. Yurchikhin manually piloted the vehicle to its new home, the Rassvet module, where it docked successfully at 3:38 p.m. This is the first docking to Rassvet, which was delivered to the station in May on the STS-132 mission of space shuttle Atlantis.

The Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft moves from the International Space Station’s Zvezda service module to the Rassvet module. Credit: NASA TV

The Soyuz TMA-19 spacecraft moves from the International Space Station’s Zvezda service module to the Rassvet module. Credit: NASA TV

Flight directors delayed the move because of an electrical failure on a remote power controller beta gimbal assembly latch on the 4B solar array on the P4 truss. Once the solar array was repositioned, the operation continued as planned.

The flyover and docking needed to be performed manually since Rassvet will not be outfitted with the Kurs automated rendezvous equipment until a spacewalk July 26 by Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko to equip the Russian module with Kurs docking target, electrical, data and Ethernet cables.

The relocation makes room for the ISS Progress 38 cargo craft which will arrive at the International Space Station Friday. The cargo ship is slated to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Wednesday at 11:35 a.m. EDT (9:35 p.m. Kazakhstan time). The new Progress is loaded with 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 220 pounds of water and 2,667 pounds of equipment, spare parts and experiment hardware.

Meanwhile, Kornienko assisted Commander Alexander Skvortsov in a session with the Russian Pilot-M experiment. Pilot-M tests piloting skill in simulations on a laptop under stopwatch control and studies the response of cosmonauts to the effects of stress factors in flight.

Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson spent time analyzing water samples from the outpost’s Water Recovery System.

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