Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for Soyuz Move, Shuttle Arrival

Station Crew Prepares for Soyuz Move, Shuttle Arrival

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed May 12, 2010 7:21 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – On the eve of the relocation of a Soyuz spacecraft, the Expedition 23 crew of the International Space Station spent Tuesday tackling science and station maintenance and gearing up for the arrival of space shuttle Atlantis.

Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi are scheduled to move their Soyuz TMA-17 spacecraft to a different docking port Wednesday. With Kotov at the helm, the trio will take a 20-minute ride aboard the Soyuz as it undocks from the Earth-facing port of the Zarya module around 9:20 a.m. EDT and moves to the aft end of the Zvezda service module. NASA Television coverage of the Soyuz move begins at 9 a.m.

Expedition 23 Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer is pictured near the Microgravity Science Glovebox located in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Expedition 23 Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer is pictured near the Microgravity Science Glovebox located in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

The relocation of Soyuz TMA-17 sets the stage for the next addition to the space station: the Russian-built Mini Research Module-1, also known as Rassvet, which will be delivered by the STS-132 crew aboard Atlantis and permanently installed on the Zarya module. Rassvet, which means “dawn” in Russian, will provide additional storage space and a new docking port for Russian spacecraft.

To prepare for the arrival of Atlantis and the three spacewalks the STS-132 crew will perform, Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson spent much of her day working in the Quest airlock. Caldwell Dyson conducted maintenance on the water tanks and cooling loops of the U.S. spacesuits and recorded a video tour of the airlock to help the STS-132 crew become familiar with its layout.

Working in the Russian Zvezda service module, Flight Engineers Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Kornienko installed interface cables for the angular rate sensors of the onboard equipment control system. Also, Kornienko participated in a physical fitness evaluation as he exercised on a treadmill, while Skvortsov worked with a Russian experiment that observes the transition of energy levels of atoms in the Earth’s atmosphere.

The station’s residents also had several opportunities for Earth observation and photography as they orbited the world every 90 minutes. Among the sites suggested for photography by scientists were Dakar, Senegal, which is the westernmost city in Africa, and the capital city of Pyongyang, North Korea.

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