Headlines > News > Station Crew Off-Duty on Friday, Prepares for Visiting Vehicle Operations

Station Crew Off-Duty on Friday, Prepares for Visiting Vehicle Operations

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Sat May 8, 2010 8:08 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – The six-member Expedition 23 crew observed the Russian Victory Day holiday with an off-duty day Friday. The three Russian cosmonauts aboard the International Space Station are Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers Alexander Skvortsov and Mikhail Kornienko.

Over the course of the coming week, the unmanned, trash-filled ISS Progress 36 cargo craft will undock and the Soyuz TMA-17 will change docking ports. Space shuttle Atlantis will deliver the Rassvet Russian Mini-Research Module on the STS-132 mission.

Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer (foreground) and Tracy Caldwell Dyson were in the U.S. Quest airlock Thursday resizing spacesuits for the upcoming STS-132 mission. Credit: NASA TV

Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer (foreground) and Tracy Caldwell Dyson were in the U.S. Quest airlock Thursday resizing spacesuits for the upcoming STS-132 mission. Credit: NASA TV

Progress 36 undocks Monday from the aft end of the Zvezda service module. Engineering tests will be conducted on the resupply craft before it deorbits over the Pacific Ocean in early June.

The Soyuz TMA-17 will undock from the Zarya module’s Earth-facing port on Wednesday. With Kotov at the controls, alongside fellow crew members Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi, the TMA-17 will redock to Zvezda’s free aft end port. Zarya’s port will then be available for the new Rassvet.

NASA astronauts and Flight Engineers Creamer and Tracy Caldwell Dyson have been preparing for the upcoming STS-132 mission. On Thursday, they were in the U.S. Quest airlock resizing spacesuits for the three spacewalks planned for Atlantis’ time at the station. They also have been pre-packing gear to be returned to Earth aboard Atlantis. STS-132 is scheduled to launch at 2:20 p.m. EDT on May 14, and its six-member crew will arrive at the orbiting laboratory two days later.

Noguchi, representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, took note of his diet by filling out a food frequency questionnaire on a medical equipment computer. The inputs help experts on the ground ensure a crew member is receiving the nutritional requirements vital to bone, muscle, cardiovascular and other systems necessary to maintain health upon return from microgravity.

Creamer continued work with the IntraVenous Fluid GENeration for Exploration Missions (IVGEN) experiment. Operating in the Microgravity Sciences Glovebox, IVGEN is a prototype system for producing sterile water that meets requirements for medical treatment and care capabilities during long-term exploration missions.

During their off time, the crew members had opportunities to photograph the capitals of Vietnam, Botswana and Dominica. The imagery is part of the Crew Earth Observations program that experts use to study urban and natural landmarks.

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