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Expedition 23 and STS-131 Crews Work Together Aboard Station

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Apr 9, 2010 8:00 am via: ESA
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(NASA) – The Expedition 23 and STS-131 crews are continuing their joint operations aboard the International Space Station.

The crews have begun to unload the Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module and transfer 17,000 pounds of science racks and other supplies into the station, a job that will take several days.

Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson assists STS-131 Mission Specialists Clay Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (both out of frame) inside the Quest airlock before the beginning of a spacewalk. Image Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson assists STS-131 Mission Specialists Clay Anderson and Rick Mastracchio (both out of frame) inside the Quest airlock before the beginning of a spacewalk. Image Credit: NASA TV

STS-131 Mission Specialist Clayton Anderson and Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi opened the hatch to the “moving van” at 7:58 a.m. EDT Thursday. The module was relocated from Discovery’s payload bay to a port on the Harmony node at 12:24 a.m.

The Italian-built module’s more than 17,000 pounds of cargo includes four experiment racks along with the final private crew quarters. This is the final roundtrip to the station for the 21-foot-long, 15-foot-diameter Leonardo. Once back on Earth, the module will be reconfigured with increased shielding on the outside for the STS-133 mission in September when it will be left on the station as a permanent module.

Anderson also reviewed procedures with Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio for the mission’s first spacewalk which began at 1:31 a.m. Friday.

The STS-131 mission has three planned spacewalks, with work to include replacing an ammonia tank assembly, retrieving a Japanese experiment from the station’s exterior, and switching out a rate gyro assembly on the S0 segment of the station’s truss structure.

STS-131 is the 33rd shuttle mission to the station.

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