Headlines > News > Expedition 22 Preparing for Upcoming Soyuz and Shuttle Activities

Expedition 22 Preparing for Upcoming Soyuz and Shuttle Activities

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Sat Mar 6, 2010 3:56 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev will complete their stay onboard the International Space Station on March 18. They will undock their Soyuz TMA-16 from the orbiting laboratory at 4:03 a.m. EDT and land in Kazakhstan about 3 1/2 hours later.

Staying behind will be new station commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi. The three crew members will become the Expedition 23 crew. Joining them two weeks later will be new crew members Alexander Skvortsov, Tracy Caldwell-Dyson and Mikhail Kornienko. They will launch aboard the Soyuz TMA-18 from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on April 2.

Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams (center) and Flight Engineers Soichi Noguchi and T.J. Creamer conduct a conference with reporters on the ground Friday morning. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams (center) and Flight Engineers Soichi Noguchi and T.J. Creamer conduct a conference with reporters on the ground Friday morning. Credit: NASA TV

As the off-going crew members packed gear for the return home, Williams also performed hatch seal checks in the American side of the station.

Williams, Creamer and Noguchi spent some time Friday morning talking to reporters on the ground. The trio conducted interviews with MSNBC and the Wall Street Journal Digital Network.

Space shuttle Discovery is due to launch to the space station on April 5, beginning the STS-131 mission. Discovery and its seven-member crew will deliver new science racks for the station inside the Italian-built Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.

Science continues in space as the orbiting crew set up an experiment inside the Human Research Facility. The experiment seeks to study the long-term effects of microgravity on a crew member’s heart. The Columbus lab’s Fluids Science Laboratory had its video hardware updated, and the crew collected samples from the station’s air and water, as well as various equipment surfaces, to be analyzed for microbial growth.

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