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Station Crew Easing Into Regular Work Schedule

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Feb 24, 2010 10:16 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – The Expedition 22 crew members of the orbiting International Space Station enjoyed the second of three light-duty days Tuesday as they ease back into a regular work schedule following nine days of joint operations with the crew of space shuttle Endeavour and computer troubles over the weekend.

The station’s three Command and Control Computers continue to function well after flight controllers in Houston’s Mission Control Center isolated the issue that caused the units to switch their roles on Sunday. The station’s Mission Management Team met Tuesday to discuss additional work to be done on those systems and to develop contingency plans should problems recur.

The International Space Station is seen from space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation Friday. Credit: NASA

The International Space Station is seen from space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation Friday. Credit: NASA

Meanwhile on the station, Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer performed troubleshooting on the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), attempting to locate the source of a leakage from the Urine Pretreat Assembly rack. The Water Recovery System of ECLSS provides clean water by reclaiming wastewater, including urine and cabin humidity condensate.

In the Kibo module, Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi checked in on Dewey’s Forest, a Japanese educational payload featuring garden plants such as carnations and peppermint growing in the weightless environment of the station. The project is intended to show how gravity controls the laws of nature and influences our ways of thinking.

Late in the day Creamer and Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev served as subjects in the PanOptic experiment as Commander Jeff Williams examined their eyes with an ophthalmoscope. This procedure captures detailed images and video of the eye for study by experts back on Earth.

The station’s residents also had several opportunities for Earth observation and photography as they orbited the world every 90 minutes. Among the sites suggested for photography were the city of La Paz, which lies at the southern end of Lake Titicaca in Bolivia, and the Chaiten Volcano in Chile, which erupted in May 2008 and resulted in the entire town of Chaiten being abandoned.

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