Headlines > News > Cupola Relocated to Tranquility's Earth-Facing Port

Cupola Relocated to Tranquility's Earth-Facing Port

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Mon Feb 15, 2010 8:34 am via: NASA
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – The crew has relocated the cupola at 1:25 a.m. EST from the Tranquility node’s forward side to Tranquility’s nadir (Earth-facing) port. The next stage was to deploy four latches to temporarily place it on the node. A series of 16 bolts then secured the cupola to its permanent location.

On Sunday, Mission Specialists Robert Behnken and Nicholas Patrick completed the second of three spacewalks planned for the STS-130 mission at 3:14 a.m.

The cupola, attached to the station's robotic arm, is relocated to Tranquility's Earth-facing port. Image credit: NASA TV

The cupola, attached to the station's robotic arm, is relocated to Tranquility's Earth-facing port. Image credit: NASA TV

The spacewalkers connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on Tranquility for the relocation of its cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

Endeavour now is scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center at 10:16 p.m. next Sunday, Feb. 21, after undocking from the station at 7:54 p.m. Friday. A new flight day 11, beginning Wednesday afternoon, will support moving two Water Recovery System racks, the Waste Hygiene Compartment and the Oxygen Generation System into Tranquility. That work had been on hold for repairs and test runs.

The STS-130 mission includes three spacewalks and the delivery of a connecting module that will increase the station’s interior space. Node 3, known as Tranquility, will provide additional room for crew members and many of the station’s life support and environmental control systems. Attached to the node is a cupola, which is a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that will provide a panoramic view of Earth, celestial objects and visiting spacecraft. After the node and cupola are added, the space station will be about 90 percent complete.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use