Headlines > News > Station Crew Does Science, Awaits Spacecraft

Station Crew Does Science, Awaits Spacecraft

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Tue Feb 2, 2010 12:51 pm via: NASA
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(NASA) – The Expedition 22 crew continued its regular science and maintenance duties Monday while awaiting the impending arrivals of the ISS Progress 36 cargo ship and space shuttle Endeavour.

The Progress, which is due to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan Tuesday, rolled out to its launch pad early Monday. Filled with 1,940 pounds of propellant, 106 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 2,683 pounds of spare parts and supplies, Progress 36 is scheduled to dock to the aft port of the Zvezda service module Thursday night.

Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams (center) and Flight Engineers Soichi Noguchi (left) and T.J. Creamer answer questions from students in the Troy, Michigan School District. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams (center) and Flight Engineers Soichi Noguchi (left) and T.J. Creamer answer questions from students in the Troy, Michigan School District. Credit: NASA TV

After the Progress docks, the five station crew members will unload new supplies and gear then reload it with trash and other discarded items. Endeavour will deliver the Tranquility Node, the Cupola and spare items for the station’s Water Recovery System which has been down since fall of last year. Endeavour will also return various station gear and science experiments back to Earth.

The station crew conducted a transfer conference Monday in advance of Endeavour’s STS-130 mission. The shuttle is slated to launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida Sunday.

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev worked with the radiation payload suite Matryoshka-R. The Russian payload is designed for sophisticated radiation studies and is named after the traditional Russian set of nested dolls.

Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov conducted an observation with the Rusalka experiment, which is a test of procedures for remote determination of methane and carbon dioxide content in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer set up and activated the Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) experiment. EarthKAM, an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera aboard the station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available online for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics and social science.

Early Monday, Creamer joined Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi in responding to questions from students in the Troy, Michigan school district.

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