Headlines > News > Station Crew Preps for STS-130, Performs Science and Maintenance

Station Crew Preps for STS-130, Performs Science and Maintenance

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Jan 29, 2010 10:18 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – The Expedition 22 crew members aboard the International Space Station were busy Thursday with preparations for the arrival of space shuttle Endeavour and a variety of science and maintenance activities.

Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov had time to practice their digital photography skills in preparation for the rendezvous pitch maneuver photography they will conduct as Endeavour approaches the station for docking on flight day three of the STS-130 mission. They will capture detailed digital imagery of Endeavour’s heat shield that will be sent down to Earth to be analyzed by experts at Johnson Space Center.

Man-made archipelagos near Dubai, United Arab Emirates are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Man-made archipelagos near Dubai, United Arab Emirates are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Endeavour and the STS-130 crew are targeted for launch on Feb. 7. While docked at the station, the STS-130 crew will conduct three spacewalks to install and outfit the Italian-built Tranquility node and the seven-windowed Cupola.

Williams, with Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi, worked in the Japanese Kibo module on the removal of the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, which is to scheduled to receive a new adsorbent bed during STS-130.

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev and Kotov replaced a vacuum pump control unit in the Vozdukh carbon dioxide removal system after Russian specialists identified it as the cause for a failure in the system last week.

Suraev and Kotov also worked with the Plasma Crystal-3 Plus experiment, which studies the behavior of electrically-charged dust particles in a space environment.

In the Kibo module, Noguchi conducted an in-flight educational event with the Hamada-Higashi Junior High School in Japan. Noguchi answered a variety of questions about his activities and life aboard the station.

Last week the station crew received personal access to the Internet and the World Wide Web for the first time. Williams, Noguchi and Creamer took some time Sunday to record their thoughts on this milestone and talk about how they will use this access to inform the public about their activities. Also, Jeff Williams responded to some questions he received on YouTube concerning the station’s orientation, life in space and the recent butterfly experiment.

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