Headlines > News > After Busy Weekend, Station Crew Focuses on Science

After Busy Weekend, Station Crew Focuses on Science

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Tue Jan 26, 2010 10:12 am via: NASA
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After a busy weekend, the Expedition 22 crew aboard the orbiting International Space Station devoted most of its time Monday to a variety of science experiments.

Flight Engineer Oleg Kotov worked with the Plasma Crystal-3 Plus experiment, which consists of a series of tests which study the state of plasma, including the temperature and pressure at which the liquid and gaseous phases of a substance become identical. This investigation will provide a better understanding of the environment of space.

The Port-au-Prince area of Haiti is seen from the International Space Station days after the region was heavily damaged by a magnitude 7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12. Credit: NASA

The Port-au-Prince area of Haiti is seen from the International Space Station days after the region was heavily damaged by a magnitude 7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12. Credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi spent time on the Marangoni experiment, a fluid physics experiment that observes the flow of a fluid driven by surface tension.

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev had a session with the Russian behavioral assessment TYPOLOGY, setting up the workstation, connecting equipment, suiting up and launching the program on a laptop computer. TYPOLOGY measures a crew member’s psychophysical state and ability to withstand stress, to perform and to communicate. An EEG measures and records the electrical activity of the brain.

Saturday, Expedition 22 Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer used Canadarm2, the station’s robotic arm, to grapple and remove Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) from the port side of the Unity node and then berth it to the zenith, or top, side of the Harmony node. This was done to free up Unity’s port side for the installation of the Tranquility node next month during the STS-130 mission of space shuttle Endeavour.

The six-member crew of Endeavour is targeted to launch on Feb. 7 and deliver the Tranquility node and Cupola.

On Flight Day 9 of STS-130, PMA-3 will be relocated one more time, to the forward end of Tranquility, one day after the Cupola is detached from that same end to be installed on the nadir, or Earth-facing, port of Tranquility.

The Zvezda service module’s engines were fired Sunday, lifting the station’s orbit. This was the second of two reboost maneuvers, the first of which was performed Friday, designed to bring the station to the proper altitude for the docking of Endeavour planned for Feb. 9.

Before Endeavour arrives, the Russian Progress 36 vehicle loaded with supplies to replenish the International Space Station will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Feb. 3 and dock two days later.

Last week the station crew received personal access to the Internet and the World Wide Web for the first time. Expedition 22 Flight Engineer T.J. Creamer made first use of the new system Friday when he posted the first unassisted update to his Twitter account, @Astro_TJ, from the space station.

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