Headlines > News > Station Crew Readies for Thursday Spacewalk, Discusses Twitter

Station Crew Readies for Thursday Spacewalk, Discusses Twitter

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Jan 14, 2010 8:58 am via: NASA
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(NASA) – The International Space Station crew members had a light workday Wednesday then adjusted their sleep schedule for an early wakeup to begin work on the only scheduled spacewalk of the Expedition 22 mission.

Flight Engineers Maxim Suraev and Oleg Kotov will exit the station around 5:10 a.m. EST Thursday to ready the Mini-Research Module 2, known as Poisk, for future Russian vehicle dockings. NASA TV will begin coverage of the spacewalk at 4:30 a.m.

Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev works with spacewalk equipment in the Zvezda service module of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev works with spacewalk equipment in the Zvezda service module of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

The excursion marks the third spacewalk for Kotov, who made two spacewalks in 2007 totaling 11 hours and two minutes as an Expedition 15 flight engineer, and the first for Suraev.

Suraev and Commander Jeff Williams will be the first to use the new docking port when they relocate their Soyuz TMA-16 spacecraft from the aft port of the Zvezda service module on Jan. 21.

Before adhering to their early sleep schedule, Williams and Flight Engineers T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi discussed “tweeting” from orbit, the value of Twitter in engaging the public from space and the upcoming advent of Internet access on the station.

Preparations continue at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the upcoming launch of space shuttle Endeavour on its mission to the station. One of the primary objectives of the STS-130/20A mission is the delivery and activation of the new Tranquility module. Among the activation tasks are the installation of four ammonia jumper hoses that will connect Tranquility’s cooling system to the station’s cooling system. While undergoing final flight testing at a California subcontractor’s factory on Jan. 7, one of the flight hoses failed.

Tuesday, station managers decided to continue working toward a Feb. 7 launch with full mission content. They selected an alternate hose design, assembled from shorter hoses that had been previously certified and tested for use aboard the station, as the primary jumper. They also accelerated development of a redesigned set of hoses for use in the event a problem arises with the new primary design.

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