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Experiments and Maintenance for Station Crew

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Dec 11, 2009 9:16 am via: NASA
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The Expedition 22 crew of Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Max Suraev was busy aboard the International Space Station Thursday, focusing on science and maintenance activities.

Both crew members began the workday with a daily planning conference with ground controllers and an inspection of the station’s systems.

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev performs a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev performs a check of the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

Williams consulted with experts on the ground as he prepared the station’s computers for a network reload scheduled for Friday. He also conducted a routine inspection of the station’s smoke detectors.

In the Japanese Kibo module, Williams took photographs and did a status check of the current state of experiments in the SAIBO rack.

As part of the ongoing Russian Seiner experiment, Suraev photographed and documented developments and conditions in the Earth’s oceans. His unique perspective of the Earth’s oceans provides scientists on the ground with current position coordinates of bioproductive water areas.

Suraev also performed maintenance work in the Russian segment of the station, recharging cooling loops and servicing the toilet system.

Both crew members had time set aside to exercise, which helps minimize the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the body.

Meanwhile at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the rest of the Expedition 22 crew, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, NASA’s T.J. Creamer and Soichi Noguchi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, donned their Sokol launch and entry suits and climbed aboard their Soyuz TMA-17 spacecraft for the “suited” fit check. They are scheduled for a Dec. 20 liftoff, docking with the space station two days later.

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