Headlines > News > Expedition 22 Crew Busy with Science, Maintenance and butterflies

Expedition 22 Crew Busy with Science, Maintenance and butterflies

Published by Matt on Fri Dec 4, 2009 10:44 am via: NASA
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After enjoying two days off, the Expedition 22 crew of Commander Jeff Williams and Flight Engineer Max Suraev got back to a normal work schedule aboard the International Space Station Thursday, focusing on science and maintenance activities.

Both crew members began the workday with a daily planning conference with ground controllers and an inspection of the station’s systems.

After completing its pupa stage, a Monarch butterfly emerges during the CSI-03(Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert - 03) investigation. This investigation is one in a series of educational experiments aboard the station designed to accompany in-class experiments for teachers and students. Credit: NASA

After completing its pupa stage, a Monarch butterfly emerges during the CSI-03(Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert - 03) investigation. This investigation is one in a series of educational experiments aboard the station designed to accompany in-class experiments for teachers and students. Credit: NASA

Williams consulted with experts on the ground as he worked with the laptop computer network aboard the station. He also refurbished U.S. spacesuit components, stowed spacewalking tools and recharged spacesuit batteries.

As part of an ongoing science experiment, Suraev photographed and performed a status check on the Russian Plants-2 experiment. Plants-2 researches the growth and development of plants under spaceflight conditions in a special greenhouse facility in the Zvezda service module.

Suraev also worked with RUSALKA, a Russian experiment that remotely measures methane and carbon dioxide content in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Both crew members had time set aside to exercise, which helps minimize the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the body.

Three more crew members, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi and NASA astronaut T.J. Creamer, all flight engineers, are set to join their crewmates aboard the orbiting laboratory when they launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan aboard the Soyuz TMA-17 Dec. 20, arriving at the station Dec. 23.

Expedition 21 crew members Frank De Winne, Roman Romanenko and Bob Thirsk returned to Earth aboard the Soyuz TMA-15 spacecraft Tuesday, landing on the steppes of Kazakhstan.

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