Headlines > News > Amazing Pictures from the STS-129 Mission

Amazing Pictures from the STS-129 Mission

Published by Matt on Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:36 pm via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

Written by Nancy Atkinson

If I didn’t know better, I’d swear some of the images from the STS-129 shuttle mission to the International Space Station were CGI renderings taken from a science fiction novel.

Take the above image, for example of astronaut Mike Foreman working on the exterior of the ISS during the second space walk of the mission. It looks almost surreal. But these are genuine images of real people working on an authentic, almost-completed space station.

Astronaut Mike Foreman performs a task on the exterior of the ISS. Credit: NASA

Astronaut Mike Foreman performs a task on the exterior of the ISS. Credit: NASA

This images, and the other images below, leave me in awe of what we are accomplishing in space. Enjoy this gallery of fantastic images from the fifth and last shuttle flight of 2009.

Robert Satcher on the Canadarm2 during the first space walk of STS-129. Credit: NASA

Robert Satcher on the Canadarm2 during the first space walk of STS-129. Credit: NASA

Here’s another awe-inspiring image. Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, astronaut Robert Satcher Jr. works during the first space walk of the mission. Satcher and Mike Foreman (out of frame)installed antennas, cables, and other items to prepare for the Tranquility node that will be brought up to the station next year.

Starship Enterprise? No, just the space shuttle and space station. Credit: NASA

Starship Enterprise? No, just the space shuttle and space station. Credit: NASA

There was some chatter on Twitter that this image brought to mind visions of the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek. But this is a closeup of Atlantis’ docking ring backdropped by the ISS as the shuttle crew approached for docking with the station. Docking occurred at 10:51 a.m. (CST) on Nov. 18, 2009.

Sun rise in space. Credit: NASA

Sun rise in space. Credit: NASA

Another great shot: Sunrise in space. This scene shows from the Russian section of the ISS, as photographed by one of the STS-129 crew members.

Satcher works on the Z1 truss. Credit: NASA

Satcher works on the Z1 truss. Credit: NASA

I always love these images which demonstrate how HUGE the ISS is. Here, Robert Satcher works on the Z1 truss section during the first EVA of the mission.

ISS and docked spacecraft. Credit: NASA

ISS and docked spacecraft. Credit: NASA

Taking on the appearance of a busy spaceport, the Russian segment of the ISS has a docked Soyuz spacecraft (center) and a Progress resupply vehicle that is docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment.

Mike Foreman looks at his spacewalking partner Randy Bresnik. Credit: NASA

Mike Foreman looks at his spacewalking partner Randy Bresnik. Credit: NASA

Every shuttle mission picture gallery isn’t complete without a picture of an astronaut with another astronaut visible in the helmet visor reflection. Here, Mike Foreman’s helmet reveals his crewmate, Randy Bresnik, capturing the image with an electronic still camera. The two were in the midst of the second scheduled space walk for the Atlantis crewmembers.

Upside down, or not? Credit: NASA

Upside down, or not? Credit: NASA

Who is upside down? Charlie Hobaugh (left), STS-129 commander and Robert Satcher , or the astronaut who took the picture? The two are pictured near a window in the Destiny laboratory.

Mealtime on the ISS. Credit: NASA

Mealtime on the ISS. Credit: NASA

Eight of the 12 crew members of the joint ISS/shuttle crews pose for a photo at the galley in the Unity node. Pictured from the left are NASA astronauts Leland Melvin, Robert Satcher Jr., Charlie Hobaugh, Nicole Stott, cosmonauts Roman Romanenko, Maxim Suraev, and astronauts Jeff Williams, and Frank De Winne, commander of Expedition 21 from the ESA.

Launch of Atlantis on Nov. 16, 2009. Credit: NASA

Launch of Atlantis on Nov. 16, 2009. Credit: NASA

1 Comments
jamieo
when i was a child, pictures like this completely fascinated me. now i'm much older and nothing has changed. the only word is awesome. especially the sun rising over the planet
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use