Headlines > News > NASA Satellites Detect Unexpected Ice Loss in East Antarctica

NASA Satellites Detect Unexpected Ice Loss in East Antarctica

Published by Matt on Wed Nov 25, 2009 10:42 am via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

Using gravity measurement data from the NASA/German Aerospace Center’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (Grace) mission, a team of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin has found that the East Antarctic ice sheet-home to about 90 percent of Earth’s solid fresh water and previously considered stable-may have begun to lose ice.

Estimate of changes in Antarctica's ice mass, measured in centimeters of equivalent water height change per year. Credit: NASA

Estimate of changes in Antarctica's ice mass, measured in centimeters of equivalent water height change per year. Credit: NASA

The team used Grace data to estimate Antarctica’s ice mass between 2002 and 2009. Their results, published Nov. 22 in the journal Nature Geoscience, found that the East Antarctic ice sheet is losing mass, mostly in coastal regions, at an estimated rate of 57 gigatonnes a year. A gigatonne is one billion metric tons, or more than 2.2 trillion pounds. The ice loss there may have begun as early as 2006. The study also confirmed previous results showing that West Antarctica is losing about 132 gigatonnes of ice per year.

“While we are seeing a trend of accelerating ice loss in Antarctica, we had considered East Antarctica to be inviolate,” said lead author and Senior Research Scientist Jianli Chen of the university’s Center for Space Research. “But if it is losing mass, as our data indicate, it may be an indication the state of East Antarctica has changed. Since it’s the biggest ice sheet on Earth, ice loss there can have a large impact on global sea level rise in the future.”

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., developed the twin Grace satellites. The University of Texas Center for Space Research in Austin has overall Grace mission responsibility. Grace was launched in 2002.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use