Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for Space Shuttle Arrivals

Station Crew Prepares for Space Shuttle Arrivals

Published by Matt on Thu Nov 5, 2009 12:49 pm via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

The International Space Station’s Expedition 21 crew performed a variety of maintenance work Wednesday, preparing the orbiting outpost for future space shuttle visits that will deliver spare parts and a U.S. module.

Flight Engineers Nicole Stott and Jeff Williams resized spacesuits in the Quest airlock in preparation for the STS-129 space shuttle mission planned to launch Nov. 16. The crew of Atlantis will conduct three spacewalks at the station to transfer spare parts from the shuttle’s payload bay to the station’s external structures and continue assembly activities.

xpedition 21 Flight Engineers Nicole Stott and Jeff Williams work in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

xpedition 21 Flight Engineers Nicole Stott and Jeff Williams work in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Preparations for the upcoming addition of the Tranquility module continued as Commander Frank De Winne and Flight Engineer Robert Thirsk conducted leak checks of the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 following Tuesday’s work in the Unity module. Tranquility, also known as Node 3, will be delivered to the station by the crew of space shuttle Endeavour in 2010. Tranquility will provide a new berthing port as well as additional room for crew members and many of the station’s life support and environmental control systems already on board. Attached to the node will be the Cupola, a unique work module with six windows on the sides and one on top.

Stott, along with Thirsk, continued repair work on the Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) to clear a clog that has caused the system to be off-line for about a week. Analysis is continuing, but early reports indicated that at least some of the suspected plumbing blockage in the system was cleared. The UPA is part of the Water Recovery System that processes urine into purified water.

Williams also spent time working with the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) experiment that measures the on-orbit mass of station crew members. SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crew member mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass.

Thirsk conducted an amateur radio session with students from Westbrook Intermediate School in Friendswood, Texas.

Meanwhile, launch of the next Russian module, the eight-ton Mini Research Module-2 , is just a week away. Launch of the new docking port and airlock is set for Nov. 10 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Docking with the station is planned for Nov. 12.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use