Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for Cargo Craft Departure

Station Crew Prepares for Cargo Craft Departure

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Oct 29, 2009 8:06 am via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – The Expedition 21 crew of the International Space Station focused on a variety of science and housekeeping activities Wednesday and prepared for the departure of a Japanese cargo craft.

Flight Engineer Nicole Stott kicked off her workday by participating in a study of changes in aerobic capacity for station crew members during long-term spaceflight. NASA is interested in tracking aerobic capacity because the reduction in a crew member’s maximum oxygen uptake directly affects his or her ability to perform strenuous activities such as spacewalks or emergency operations.

Expedition 21 crew members talk with students in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Clockwise from lower right are Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk, Jeff Williams and Nicole Stott and Commander Frank De Winne. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 21 crew members talk with students in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Clockwise from lower right are Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk, Jeff Williams and Nicole Stott and Commander Frank De Winne. Credit: NASA TV

Meanwhile, Commander Frank De Winne checked out the new Flywheel Exercise Device (FWED), running it through five different exercise modes. FWED is a strength training system that uses a rotating flywheel instead of weight plates that rely on gravity.

Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk and Jeff Williams tackled the replacement of components in the older Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) in the Kibo laboratory. Part of the Atmosphere Revitalization System, the CDRA uses sorbent beds to remove carbon dioxide from the station’s air. A second CDRA was delivered to the station by the STS-128 mission, and is now operating in the Destiny laboratory. The older CDRA is being refurbished before being returned to duty.

Later, Thirsk worked on final preparations for Thursday’s H-II Transfer Vehicle hatch closure. The unpiloted Japanese cargo vehicle, which has been attached to the station’s Harmony node since Sept. 17, will be grappled with the station’s robotic arm and detached from the orbiting complex Friday for a destructive re-entry over the Pacific Ocean on Sunday.

Working in the Russian segment of the station, Flight Engineers Maxim Suraev and Roman Romanenko participated in a study of cardiac bioelectric activity of the heart at rest. The two cosmonauts also reconfigured navigation receiver modules to provide more favorable operational conditions.

Before retiring for the day, De Winne, Stott, Thirsk and Williams spoke with students at Mount St. Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. During the educational event broadcast live on NASA TV, the astronauts fielded a variety of questions dealing with life and work aboard their orbital home.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use