Headlines > News > Treadmill Tests and Science for Station Crew Tuesday

Treadmill Tests and Science for Station Crew Tuesday

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Oct 21, 2009 7:21 am via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – Science, maintenance and the continuing checkout of a new treadmill highlighted the Expedition 21 crew’s activities Tuesday.

After a morning inspection of their orbital home, breakfast and a brief amateur radio call by Commander Frank De Winne to students in Salerno, Italy, the crew members kicked off work preparations for the day.

NASA astronaut Nicole Stott, Expedition 21 flight engineer, is pictured in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Stott is wearing a harness used while exercising on the station. Credit: NASA

NASA astronaut Nicole Stott, Expedition 21 flight engineer, is pictured in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Stott is wearing a harness used while exercising on the station. Credit: NASA

Flight Engineer Maxim Suraev began his workday with a Russian experiment intended to provide a better understanding of pulmonary respiration in a weightless environment. Suraev was later assisted by Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko, who photographed the experiment activities.

Tasked with checking the potable water dispenser of the station’s water recovery system, Flight Engineer Robert Thirsk collected water samples from the system for onboard testing with the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer. Thirsk collected additional samples for return to Earth and further analysis.

Flight Engineer Nicole Stott returned to the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) that she and Thirsk worked on Monday and set up data, chemical and exhaust connections for the unit. The FIR is a fluid physics research facility designed to host investigations in areas such as colloids, gels, bubbles, wetting and capillary action and phase changes including boiling and cooling.

Meanwhile work continues in the Harmony node on the setup and checkout of the recently delivered Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, named for comedian Stephen Colbert. Flight Engineer Jeff Williams installed some brackets for the treadmill, and later Stott and De Winne conducted short, low-speed workouts on the device.

The crew also had time scheduled for Earth observation and photography. Among the four locations selected for crew photography were two sites associated with Charles Darwin’s voyage aboard the HMS Beagle in the 19th century: Simon’s Bay at Cape Point, South Africa, where Darwin met with noted astronomer Sir John Herschel, and Cape Tres Montes, Chile, which marked the southernmost point of the Beagle’s visit to South America.

Transfer of fuel and supplies from the ISS Progress 35 cargo craft continues aboard the station. Progress 35 docked to the station’s Pirs Docking Compartment at 9:40 p.m. EDT Saturday, delivering 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 1,750 pounds of spare parts and supplies for the Expedition 21 crew.

1 Comments
geeknight
I want be try work out on a treadmill in the space. I believe it would be a totally different experience. Amazing. I have a dream that we human can go through the space to search for other aliens. It is alway exciting when you touch new culture.
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use