Headlines > News > Expedition 21 Unloads Progress, Does Science, Maintenance

Expedition 21 Unloads Progress, Does Science, Maintenance

Published by Matt on Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:49 am via: source
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Following Saturday night’s arrival of the ISS Progress 35 resupply ship, the Expedition 21 crew aboard the International Space Station continued to unload its cargo Monday and load trash into the Japanese H-II transfer vehicle. The crew members also performed their ongoing science and maintenance duties.

The Progress 35 docked to the station’s Pirs Docking Compartment at 9:40 p.m. EDT Saturday, bringing to the orbiting laboratory 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 1,750 pounds of spare parts and supplies for the Expedition 21 crew.

Expedition 21 Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk (left) and Nicole Stott work on the installation of an Active Rack Isolation System rack aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 21 Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk (left) and Nicole Stott work on the installation of an Active Rack Isolation System rack aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

Flight Engineers Roman Romanenko and Maxim Suraev spent time monitoring the loading of new software into the Russian computers for the telerobotically operated rendezvous system, known as TORU, in the Zvezda Service Module. TORU will be used for the docking of the new Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) that is slated to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan next month. MRM2 will serve as a new docking port for arriving Russian vehicles and an additional airlock for Russian segment spacewalks at the complex.

Flight Engineers Nicole Stott and Robert Thirsk worked to install an Active Rack Isolation System in the Fluids and Combustion Facility’s Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). The FIR is a fluid physics research facility designed to host investigations in areas such as colloids, gels, bubbles, wetting and capillary action and phase changes including boiling and cooling. The isolation system dampens the effect vibration from other space station systems has on the experiments.

Flight Engineer Jeff Williams joined Commander Frank De Winne in working with the Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM) experiment. EarthKAM, an education activity, allows middle school students to program a digital camera aboard the station to photograph a variety of geographical targets for study in the classroom. Photos are made available online for viewing and study by participating schools around the world. Educators use the images for projects involving Earth Science, geography, physics and social science.

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