Headlines > News > Station Crew Conducts Fire Drill, Awaits Cargo Craft

Station Crew Conducts Fire Drill, Awaits Cargo Craft

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Oct 16, 2009 6:54 am via: source
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(NASA) – The Expedition 21 crew focused Thursday on science and maintenance as the latest unpiloted Russian cargo craft makes its way to the International Space Station.

Flight Engineer Nicole Stott began her workday with an inspection and audit of the station’s fire detection and suppression equipment. Afterwards, the entire six-member crew participated in a drill to practice initial crew actions in response to a fire aboard the orbiting complex.

This picture of the active Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat Island was photographed on Oct. 11, 2009 by the Expedition 21 crew members onboard the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

This picture of the active Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat Island was photographed on Oct. 11, 2009 by the Expedition 21 crew members onboard the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

Stott later joined Flight Engineer Jeff Williams in the Kibo module to transfer unneeded equipment to the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) for disposal. The HTV will be detached from the station around the end of October for a destructive re-entry in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Commander Frank De Winne began work to replace an electronics unit on the station’s second Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI 2), which shut down unexpectedly earlier in the week. De Winne’s work was interrupted by a water leak associated with the MELFI 2 repair effort. Williams and Stott quickly stepped in to isolate and clean up the leak.

Flight Engineer Bob Thirsk spent part of his day working with an experiment to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to microgravity on the mental representation of spatial cues by astronauts. The Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Space Flight (3D-Space) experiment involves comparisons of preflight, inflight, and postflight perceptions and mental imagery, with special reference to spaceflight-related decreases in vertical perception.

Both Russian flight engineers took advantage of the station’s vantage point for studies involving Earth’s atmosphere. Maxim Suraev conducted a session of an experiment examining the high-velocity interaction between exhaust products from spacecraft and the atmosphere, while Roman Romanenko tested a procedure for the remote detection of methane and carbon dioxide.

The ISS Progress 35 cargo resupply vehicle launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 9:14 p.m. EDT Wednesday. Progress 35 is set to dock to the station Saturday with more than two tons of oxygen, air, propellant and other supplies and equipment aboard.

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