Headlines > News > Station Crew Works with Science, Talks with U2

Station Crew Works with Science, Talks with U2

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:28 am via: source
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(NASA) – After the safe landing of the Expedition 20 crew this weekend in Kazakhstan, the Expedition 21 crew aboard the International Space Station pressed ahead Tuesday under the command of Frank De Winne, performing science-related tasks and emergency training.

U2's Bono (left) and the Edge occupy the seats normally reserved for Spacecraft Communicators (CAPCOMs) during a brief visit to the Johnson Space Center and a stop by the Mission Control Center. They were able to talk to some of the current crew members aboard the International Space Station. Credit: Courtesy of U2

U2's Bono (left) and the Edge occupy the seats normally reserved for Spacecraft Communicators (CAPCOMs) during a brief visit to the Johnson Space Center and a stop by the Mission Control Center. They were able to talk to some of the current crew members aboard the International Space Station. Credit: Courtesy of U2

Expedition 20 Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Michael Barratt returned to Earth Saturday, landing on the steppe of Kazakhstan in their Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft after a 197 day-long stay aboard the station. With them was Canadian spaceflight participant Guy Laliberte who launched to the station Sept. 30 with Expedition 21 crew members Jeff Williams and Maxim Suraev.

Flight Engineer Nicole Stott worked with the Space Seed experiment which investigates the role of gravity in regulating the developmental processes of higher plants. The plants and seeds are harvested periodically and stored in the station’s freezer and transported back to Earth for analysis.

Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko worked with the Russian experiment Plants-2, which researches growth and development of plants under spaceflight conditions in a greenhouse facility in the Zvezda service module.

U2's the Edge (right) and Paul McGuinness, the group's tour manager, get a chance to "fly" the space shuttle during their visit to the Johnson Space Center thanks to a brief session in the motion-based version of the Shuttle Mission Simulator at the Jake Garn Mission Simulation and Training Facility. Credit: Courtesy of U2

U2's the Edge (right) and Paul McGuinness, the group's tour manager, get a chance to "fly" the space shuttle during their visit to the Johnson Space Center thanks to a brief session in the motion-based version of the Shuttle Mission Simulator at the Jake Garn Mission Simulation and Training Facility. Credit: Courtesy of U2

De Winne, along with the station’s newest residents Williams and Suraev, conducted an emergency egress drill to help prepare them for the unlikely event that they would need to evacuate the station in an emergency situation.

The six crew members had time set aside to participate in an ESA event to commemorate De Winne becoming the first European commander of station.

The crew also spoke with members of the rock band U2 during a call from Mission Control Center in Houston.

At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the ISS Progress 35 resupply ship was transported to its launch pad Monday to prepare for launch to the station. Launch is scheduled for Wednesday at 9:14 p.m. EDT, with docking scheduled for Saturday. The Progress is carrying 1,918 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 1,750 pounds of spare parts and supplies for the Expedition 21 crew.

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