Headlines > News > Station Crew Transfers Exposed Experiments; Conducts Science

Station Crew Transfers Exposed Experiments; Conducts Science

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Thu Sep 24, 2009 7:08 am via: source
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(NASA) – The International Space Station’s Expedition 20 crew members performed an array of science-related tasks Wednesday as they transferred experiments exposed to the vacuum of space and conducted scientific research.

Flight Engineers Nicole Stott, Frank De Winne and Robert Thirsk transferred an experiments pallet from the newly-arrived Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) to the Exposed Facility of the Kibo module. They used the Canadarm2 robotic arm to grapple and remove the pallet from the unpressurized cargo section of the HTV and handed it to the Japanese robotic arm, which they used to attach the pallet to the exposed facility. Individual experiments will be removed from the pallet and installed Thursday. The empty pallet will be transferred back to the HTV for disposal when the cargo craft is deorbited in late October or early November.

Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk (left) and Nicole Stott demonstrate sleeping conditions aboard the International Space Station while answering questions from students in Vulcan, Alberta. Credit: NASA TV

Flight Engineers Robert Thirsk (left) and Nicole Stott demonstrate sleeping conditions aboard the International Space Station while answering questions from students in Vulcan, Alberta. Credit: NASA TV

As part of an ongoing science experiment, Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko photographed and performed a status check on the Russian Plants-2 experiment. Plants-2 researches the growth and development of plants under spaceflight conditions in a special greenhouse facility.

Commander Gennady Padalka took microbial samples for a Russian experiment that studies the environmental conditions of station module wall panels and other areas possibly susceptible to corrosion.

Flight Engineer Michael Barratt and Padalka stowed equipment in the docked Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft as they prepare to leave after a six-month stay aboard the station. They are scheduled to leave aboard the Soyuz on Oct. 10 and land in Kazakhstan the next day.

All the astronauts aboard the station also gathered for an in-flight interview, answering questions from students in Vulcan, Alberta.

The new Atmospheric Revitalization System (ARS) rack is running well. Thirsk and De Winne installed it to a temporary position inside the Destiny laboratory Tuesday. Delivered by space shuttle Discovery on the recent STS-128 mission, the new ARS is destined for final installation in the Tranquility node, which will be added to the orbiting complex in February. Ground controllers are particularly interested in verifying that the new Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly of the ARS functions normally.

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