Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for the Arrival of Discovery

Station Crew Prepares for the Arrival of Discovery

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Aug 21, 2009 10:29 am via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – The Expedition 20 crew aboard the International Space Station kicked preparations into high gear Thursday for the arrival of space shuttle Discovery set for next week.

Discovery, scheduled to launch Aug. 25 on the STS-128 mission, is carrying more than seven tons of supplies, science racks and equipment, as well as additional environmental hardware to sustain six crew members on the orbital outpost. The shuttle also will deliver the newest Expedition crew member, astronaut Nicole Stott, for a three-month stay aboard the station.

Hurricane Bill is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

Hurricane Bill is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA

All six station crew members participated in a conference with ground controllers to review and discuss the STS-128 mission timeline.

Flight Engineer Tim Kopra, who will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery, continued preparations for his departure and the arrival of his replacement.

Flight engineers Robert Thirsk and Frank De Winne collected and packed items that will be returned to Earth aboard Discovery. They also had time set aside to complete crew medical officer proficiency training.

Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Mike Barratt practiced their photography skills to prepare for taking detailed digital imagery of Discovery’s heat shield prior to its docking to the station. The photos will be sent down to Earth to be analyzed by experts at Johnson Space Center.

Barratt also put away hardware from Wednesday’s session with the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions 2 (InSPACE-2) experiment. InSPACE-2 studies fluids that can be used to improve or develop new brake systems and robotics.

Later, Barratt and Thirsk worked with the 3D Space experiment, which involves distance, writing and illusion exercises designed to test the hypothesis that altered visual perception affects motor control.

Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko worked in the Russian segment of the station performing science experiments, routine maintenance and tagging up with specialists on the ground.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use