Headlines > News > Preparations Begin for Japanese Cargo Ship Arrival

Preparations Begin for Japanese Cargo Ship Arrival

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:36 am via: source
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(NASA) – Preparations began aboard the International Space Station Monday for September’s scheduled arrival of the new Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle, or HTV.

Expedition 20 flight engineers Mike Barratt and Frank De Winne took part in computer-based training for the HTV’s rendezvous with the orbital outpost.

Aorounga Impact Crater is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Aorounga Impact Crater is located in the Sahara Desert of north-central Chad. Credit: NASA

Aorounga Impact Crater is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Aorounga Impact Crater is located in the Sahara Desert of north-central Chad. Credit: NASA

The HTV is slated to launch from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA’s) launch site at Tanegashima Island, Japan on Sept. 10 for an automated rendezvous with the station. Canadarm2 will be used to grapple the craft and berth it to the nadir, or Earth-facing, port of the Harmony module for a month’s stay.

Barratt and analysts on the ground completed troubleshooting the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) over the weekend after a warning light had been activated last week. The WHC is operating properly now and the crew was given a go to resume use. A similar situation occurred during STS-127 when space shuttle Endeavour was at the station.

Station Commander Gennady Padalka, along with flight engineers Barratt, De Winne, Robert Thirsk and Tim Kopra held a conference with the ground team regarding the upcoming STS-128 space shuttle mission. They reviewed spacewalk procedures and tasks that will take place during space shuttle Discovery’s visit to the station scheduled for later this month.

Barratt also performed maintenance on the cooling loop in the Quest airlock in preparation for the shuttle’s arrival.

Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko stowed hardware for disposal in the Progress cargo craft.

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