Headlines > News > Robotics Work Prepares Station for Tranquility Node

Robotics Work Prepares Station for Tranquility Node

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Fri Aug 7, 2009 8:28 pm via: source
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(NASA) – Expedition 20 flight engineers Robert Thirsk and Frank De Winne have completed robotics work preparing the station for the new Tranquility Node and Cupola next year. Early Friday morning, they used the Canadarm2 to move pressurized mating adapter-3 (PMA-3) from the bottom of the Unity Node to its temporary position on the Unity’s port side.

The PMA-3 will be returned later to Unity’s nadir, or Earth-facing side, setting the stage for Tranquility, with the Cupola attached, to be installed to Unity’s port side. Space shuttle Endeavour is delivering the new elements to the International Space Station during the STS-130 mission in February.

The Canadarm2 positions the pressurized mating adapter before attaching it to the port side of the Unity Node. Credit: NASA TV

The Canadarm2 positions the pressurized mating adapter before attaching it to the port side of the Unity Node. Credit: NASA TV

After the robotics moving work was completed, the Canadarm2 was positioned so station crew members can train for the upcoming arrival of Japan’s new HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) cargo vehicle in September. The robotic arm will be used to grapple the HTV as it nears the station and berth it to the bottom of the Harmony Node.

Flight Engineer Michael Barratt and analysts on the ground have completed troubleshooting the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) after a warning light had been activated. The WHC is operating properly now and the crew has been given a go to resume use. A similar situation occurred during STS-127 when space shuttle Endeavour was at the station.

The International Space Station is now in the proper orbit for rendezvous operations with space shuttle Discovery when it arrives on its next mission, STS-128. The docked ISS Progress 34 cargo craft fired its engines on Aug. 1 lifting the station to the correct altitude.

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