Headlines > News > Station Crew Prepares for Transfers and Arrivals; Does Science

Station Crew Prepares for Transfers and Arrivals; Does Science

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Wed Aug 5, 2009 9:31 pm via: source
Share
More share options
Tools
Tags

(NASA) – The Expedition 20 crew aboard the International Space Station updated the outpost’s computer software for the arrival of an unmanned resupply ship next month, prepared for Friday’s move of Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) and continued human space adaptation studies Wednesday.

The new software is essential for the inaugural mission of the unmanned Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) in September. The command and control computers are now ready for the HTV rendezvous and mating, which will use the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, and cameras installed on the Kibo module’s new porch during space shuttle Endeavour’s recent visit. The HTV, scheduled to launch Sept. 10, will deliver food and supplies.

Teide Volcano on the Canary Islands of Spain is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Teide Volcano on the Canary Islands of Spain is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

The crew also reviewed plans for Friday’s robotic operations to grapple and move PMA-3 from an Earth-facing port on the Unity module and to a port on the side of the same module. Flight Engineer Tim Kopra will configure common berthing mechanisms, and flight engineers Robert Thirsk and Frank De Winne will control Canadarm2. This move will free the Earth-facing port for next year’s installation of the new Tranquility module and the Cupola to be delivered by the STS-130 space shuttle crew.

Kopra, Thirsk and De Winne also worked with the Space Linear Acceleration Mass Measurement Device (SLAMMD) experiment that measures the on-orbit mass of station crew members. SLAMMD follows Newton’s Second Law of Motion by having two springs generate a known force against a crew member mounted on an extension arm, the resulting acceleration being used to calculate the subject’s mass.

Commander Gennady Padalka and Flight Engineer Roman Romanenko performed routine maintenance on the air conditioning in the Russian segment of the station.

Throughout the day, the crew had time set aside for Earth observation and photography. The targets for Wednesday included the Baikonur Cosmodrome integration facility in Kazakhstan.

No comments
Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this article!
Leave a reply
You must be logged in to post a comment.
© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use