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SS1 Altitude limit

Posted by: JamesHughes - Tue Oct 05, 2004 1:33 pm
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SS1 Altitude limit 
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Space Station Commander
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Post SS1 Altitude limit   Posted on: Tue Oct 05, 2004 1:33 pm
Does anyone have any idea how much further SS1 would be able to fly before re-rentry stress become too high for the design?

James


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Post    Posted on: Tue Oct 05, 2004 3:25 pm
If someone really knows it will be Burt Rutan I suppose.

But it may be that he wants to find out by real flights what proves to be the limit in practice of reality.

And it's a very good question to be answered by the XPRIZE CUP. Might he again be a competitor?



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Post 100 kilometers   Posted on: Wed Oct 06, 2004 9:39 pm
Comments about the limits: I was surprised to read that the minimum altitud limit is 100 km.
My surprise was to see the limit expressed in kilomerters, not in miles !!! :D

This is an other great revolution ! :wink:

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Post Re: 100 kilometers   Posted on: Thu Oct 07, 2004 8:45 am
Orteig wrote:
Comments about the limits: I was surprised to read that the minimum altitud limit is 100 km.
My surprise was to see the limit expressed in kilomerters, not in miles !!! :D


Well sort of. This is only because it's a nice round number rather than 67 miles or whatever. The Americans were still going for 328,000 feet (notice the number on the aircraft of N328K), which makes sense to the Brits and the Americans, but everyone else is happier with kilometres. Actually, as a Brit, as I use both feet/metres/kilometres/miles interchangeably, I can get very confused! :lol:

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Post    Posted on: Thu Oct 07, 2004 6:34 pm
100 KM is the internationally recognized boudary of "space" ...it is in fact, an arbitrary "round" number.

The U.S. actually uses 50 miles, which is obviously less. Only 2 X-15 pilots are intrnationally recognized as astronauts, but something like 4 or 5 of them have U.S. military-issue "astronaut wings"

Melvill and Binnie were given FAA "Astronaut Wings" because they exceeded 50 miles, not 100 KM


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