Community > Forum > Perception, Barriers & Regulation of Privatized Space Travel > Regulation might face well-known problems

Regulation might face well-known problems

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Sep 24, 2004 1:10 pm
Post new topic Reply to topic
 [ 5 posts ] 
Regulation might face well-known problems 
Author Message
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post Regulation might face well-known problems   Posted on: Fri Sep 24, 2004 1:10 pm
Space travels are taking place in regions not ruled by national laws because they are not public property of any country. Launches only are ruled by the countries.

And orbits at what altitude ever are going around the whole world.

That means, that regulation will be possible only if all countries - 100% - not only close a treaty containing numerous detailed rules but make them national laws too. In democratic countries this would require ratification by the parliaments populated by representatives understanding really nothing of space travels, spacecrafts, engines, propellants, nozzles, computers and orbits etc..

But much earlier before there would be a treaty to be closed there will be a very hard struggle for national interests.

This all is experience from other topics - Kyoto-Protocol for example.

So what about getting rid of the countries by establishing own rules by the spacetravel- and spacecraft-firms and -community itself? Private treaties and agreements? They will include the whole world automatically because the teams and firms and customers will be from allover the world as the list of XPRIZE-teams shows.

Done this dangers faced by the spacetravel-community might be reduced because the self-regulation will be an obstacle to the all the countries and it will be better than each treaty the countries could agree on. In Germany there is self-regulation by the press as well as by the advertisement-firms - the politicians very seldom try to regulate these acticities.

What self-regulation might be possible by Scaled Composites, The da Vinci Project, Armadillo and all the others as well as by theier potential customers?



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Space Station Member
Space Station Member
User avatar
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2004 7:09 pm
Posts: 485
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 24, 2004 3:38 pm
They simply can't, they are no government, governments wont simply allow anyone to make rules, unless it would be with NASA's approval.

I do agree that there would be a completely seperate 'government' for a space fairing civilization, but since we cannot even fix the smalles problems on the ground (in political terms), i doubt space is gonna be much easier. And like you said, those who make the rules, have in practicly all cases no real understanding of the field they're making the rules for.

If you would build a space station, it would probably operate under either international law (like nato is), or under the laws of were it was built.

Either way, i dont see anything being formed anytime soon, we'll just have to stick with what we've got, but the best option would obviously be some sort of government without any existing powers and without getting any powers about space. Space should be free.


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 26, 2004 9:30 am
They can establish rules by agreement to one another I think. The spaceports can refuse access of teams not following the rules and this way accidents etc. can be prevented and avoided without intervention of governments.

Ass i said I had in mind german examples of self-regulation. In these cases the self-regulation is working very well and the government as well as the public doesn't try to establish rules of their own.

The spaccraft firms, the space travel firms, the tourists and customers and the spaceports can and should agree on rules worked out by themselves based on technical, physical, logical etc. insights available directly only to themselves. They can document them for the public. Doing so will increase the public perception and their image required to be successful at the markets.

Why should a government be required under circumstances like this?


Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Space Walker
Space Walker
avatar
Joined: Sat Jun 26, 2004 2:00 pm
Posts: 213
Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 26, 2004 11:03 am
Ekkehard Augustin wrote:
Why should a government be required under circumstances like this?
Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Political Economist)


Because governments like to get involved for the sake of getting involved.


Back to top
Profile
Moderator
Moderator
avatar
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2004 11:23 am
Posts: 3745
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Post    Posted on: Sun Sep 26, 2004 5:25 pm
That is due to the parties be in the government. The german governments don't try to be involved in the self-regulated branches - regardless of the sake of getting involved. They really "fear" to get problems if they do. This partly is aconsequence of the private property rights guaranteed by the constitution ("Grundgesetz).

So this might work in other countries too - depending on the private property rights protected by their constitutions.

Once self-regulation is established it works as political barrier protecting the branch against governmental influence. That's the german experience.



Dipl.-Volkswirt (bdvb) Augustin (Politial Economist)


Back to top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
 

Who is online 

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests


© 2014 The International Space Fellowship, developed by Gabitasoft Interactive. All Rights Reserved.  Privacy Policy | Terms of Use