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Orbital habitat internals, ideas?

Posted by: Sean Girling - Mon Sep 13, 2004 12:17 pm
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Orbital habitat internals, ideas? 
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Space Walker
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Post Orbital habitat internals, ideas?   Posted on: Mon Sep 13, 2004 12:17 pm
Hey, last night I was dreamin' about all sorts of crap, (some I'm not going to relate, ehem!), but curiously, one of the things that really made me smile was a bit about the inside of a starship. In the dream, I was visiting a starship that had grass on all the surfaces. There were different varieties being used in different places, so corridors had tough short stuff, while cabins had a mixture of the short, and some longer softer stuff too.

Hey it looked great, and I wondered where the idea came from (while still dreamin).

So, this morning, I thought about it, and I was just wondering what other peeps might think would be a great idea for the inside of their ships, habitats, cabins, whatever.

Any other cool ideas?

Zero grav wet rooms anyone?

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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 13, 2004 1:19 pm
fuzzy dice, lots of handholds, padding on the walls.


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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 13, 2004 4:28 pm
If you really would have a starship with todays technology (at least not far-fetched techno bable) you would obviously need to realise that that ship would have to be completely self contained.

Meaning, just recycling oxygen (oxygin?) is not enough, there would have to be cabins with plants that can produce oxygen and decrease the CO2 in the atmosphere. In that same cabin you can harvest vegetables and probably have some little farm in it as well.
The rest doesnt matter what it is, as long as it is efficient and not very claustrofobic, the decoration in practicly all start trek series would be acceptable and not very dull either.

But i think you're not referring to this, or are you? :wink:


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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 13, 2004 8:37 pm
Hrm...... Zero G......

I dunno, how about a room with a crapload of trampolines scattered randomly throughout the room (not just on the walls). That'd be fun.

Another room with lots of little air jets scattered and aimed fairly randomly, so you get blown all around the place. 3D invisible maze.

Oh, always padding on the walls and all of it Scotchguard. People are gonna puke all over the place.

I'm not quite sure how one would go about designing a 0-g orbital honeymoon suite, though.....

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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 13, 2004 9:03 pm
lots of giant elastic bands


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Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 17, 2004 1:32 am
bad_astra wrote:
lots of giant elastic bands


SWEET!

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Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 17, 2004 2:30 am
A swimming pool! 8)

Seriously, how would large bodies of water behave in zero G? Assuming i can get one section of the habitat filled with water, can i swim through it normally (assuming again i am wearing scuba gear)?


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Post    Posted on: Fri Sep 17, 2004 1:31 pm
water would have to be contained in a microgravity environment, so you'd definately want to have scuba gear on if you got sealed inside of it. I remember reading about a thought study someone did in the early eighties of how dolphins could be kept in a space station, and the idea was just to let them swim in a finely misted air.


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Post    Posted on: Sat Sep 18, 2004 6:44 pm
koxinga wrote:
A swimming pool! 8)

Seriously, how would large bodies of water behave in zero G? Assuming i can get one section of the habitat filled with water, can i swim through it normally (assuming again i am wearing scuba gear)?


You don't need one section filled, just a large enough volume for you to swim comfortably in. If allowed, water will form a near-perfect sphere in 0g (as demonstrated by multiple Shuttle experiments to the endless fascination of the astronauts), thus theoretically allowing people to "stand" right next to the "bottom" of the pool. Of course, in practice, people swimming around inside of the pool would make it wobble (in gravity, we'd say it would walk) around the room, eventually hitting a wall. At that point, capillary action (A.K.A. the ability of water to "stick" to just about every type of surface known to Humanity) kicks in and screws the whole works up.

But anyways, yeah. You can swim in water in 0g, and it would not be too different from swimming here on Earth. You'd have to build special airlocks, though, to keep any of the deadly water from escaping into the rest of the station -- you can drown in a five-inch sphere of water, if you're not careful. For that matter, the air conditioning system has to keep a fairly steady circulation going, or you can asphyxiate in your own exhalations if you stay in one spot too long.

Of course, the chances that anyone would want a swimming pool enough to actually haul all the water up to orbit are practically zero. At ten kilograms per cubic meter, water would only likely be hauled up for life-support purposes.

Three-quarters of our surface is covered in the stuff, but practically anywhere else, it's a rare and priceless necessity.

Bad Astra: the finely-misted air idea doesn't quite work. The water would congeal within a matter of minutes into a large globule, thus strangling the dolphins and posing a nasty little hazard for the Humans.

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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 20, 2004 6:32 am
Hauling enough water up for a decent shower would be a good place to start.

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Post    Posted on: Mon Sep 20, 2004 7:30 pm
spacecowboy wrote:
Of course, the chances that anyone would want a swimming pool enough to actually haul all the water up to orbit are practically zero. At ten kilograms per cubic meter, water would only likely be hauled up for life-support purposes.


<nitpick>One metric tonne per cubic metre</nitpick> :P


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