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Will the prize be won?

Posted by: Ben - Fri Dec 05, 2008 1:49 am
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Will the prize be won? 

Will N-Prizes be won by 19 September 2011 with the rules functionally equivalent to what they are now, including the current cost requirements?
Neither will be won. 39%  39%  [ 13 ]
The reusable prize will be won, but not the single spend. 12%  12%  [ 4 ]
The single spend will be won, but not the reusable. 12%  12%  [ 4 ]
Both prizes will be won. 36%  36%  [ 12 ]
Total votes : 33

Will the prize be won? 
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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:21 am
We still have an invite for teams that have given up or not able to finish their 'complete package' to join forces to make this challenge happen even if it takes longer than the 'final' deadline. It seems like so much talent is wasted by being spread out amongst so many different projects.

We have two launches coming up in the next month, one to 110,000' and the other to 30,000' for testing and I can't help but think there is a better way; something like a combined 'Team N-Prize' and thus reduce the time, effort, and cost of going it alone.


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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Sun Oct 14, 2012 12:01 pm
Rick Maschek wrote:
...something like a combined 'Team N-Prize' and thus reduce the time, effort, and cost of going it alone.


Dear Rick,

Why not you start a new subject called "Team N-Prize"? The groups interested in joining their efforts can say what shall they offer to the others. For sure many people is doing the same in each group.

Best,
Joshua


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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Thu Oct 18, 2012 5:09 am
Hi Joshua,

A 'Team N-Prize'? I'll think about that. I believe I suggested that awhile back on the N-Prize website. I think the problem may be in the timing. Any team presently serious about the challenge is probably wanting to do it on their own and teams that have little done may have already vanished; if you look at the lack of recent comments from the teams they are either being super secret or are no longer. I think some interest might come after this last extention by Paul runs out next year.

Problem with working on 'your own project' is that things come up to distract you. I've just been hired to work on 6 motors for another project and these type of things come up all the time.

We did test our video tracking system this weekend, received video from 60 miles at 90,000' up. Even recorded an interesting flight by someone in some of the still frames from the GoPro/Canon cameras. Should be able to easily track ISS.

As you mention, some other teams are probably also doing this in addition to trying to get their launch vehicle built.

Will be doing some rocket testing this weekend with some university students I'm mentoring. And I suppose that's why I'm interested in the N-Prize, makes a great STEM project (-;

Rick


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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Wed Jun 04, 2014 7:22 pm
Hi,

Rick, you need to get involved with STeam - Science, Technology, Engineering, ART, and Math!

Everyone knows nothing gets done without the ART part! (The biggest drawback I have found in getting people involved is they say STEM is BORRRRING, Nerdy, lacks direction, and is too closed minded.) I have found that Kids are the best BS detectors in the world.

Look at the latest "REPORT" from the NSF, which finds out the obvious, lack of plan = lack of direction = lack of accomplishment. I have been saying this since they built the shuttle and it is why "the people" are not in space!

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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Wed Jul 02, 2014 3:21 am
I'll be glad to write poetry for space, if it'll help . . .

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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:08 am
Hey guys,
We are still active!
Best,
Joshua


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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Sat Jul 12, 2014 7:58 pm
Hi,

Is the N-Prize still active, we are beginning our move from sub-orbital to orbital operations and would like to build an opensource rocket.

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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Sat Jul 12, 2014 9:21 pm
VolksRocket wrote:
Hi,

Is the N-Prize still active, we are beginning our move from sub-orbital to orbital operations and would like to build an opensource rocket.


The Forum is a bit quiet but a while back Paul made the competition time limit open ended so you are welcome to join the club tristancho's wiki sat team is I believe a fully open source and may welcome help. I and some of the Potent Voyager team did consider going down the open source route but finally decided that to raise the kind of capital needed for proper attempt we would need to protect our IP and use it as security to raise the capital needed so we are currently concentrating on writing the patent/s on our ideas and hope when we are at the patent pending stage to raise enough capital from an equity crowdfunding site to do a credible attempt that proves our concepts and ideas are worth pursuing as a way to bring cheap space flight to the masses. If you wish to join a link to the official N-Prize forum is here :-


http://n-prize.com/forum/index.php?sid= ... 58dc3bef99

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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Tue Jul 15, 2014 5:33 pm
I am still up for doing a 'Team N-Prize' to get this goal completed.

Yesterday the CSXT team successfully launched their second sub-orbital rocket for their 10th anniversary of their first launch. I congratulate them on their accomplishment and was glad I could help.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid ... tif_t=like

Their success has also re-energized my drive to see Sugar Shot to Space successfully launch (for years I had hoped our vehicle would be ready to launch on the same day)

Rick


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Post Re: Will the prize be won?   Posted on: Fri Jul 18, 2014 6:26 pm
VolksRocket wrote:
Rick, you need to get involved with STeam - Science, Technology, Engineering, ART, and Math!Everyone knows nothing gets done without the ART part!


I agree Terry. For all but two of the years I was teaching, I incorporated a rocket program either as part of my science class or an afterschool program for those either cut from the sports teams or just 'nerds' and one of the things we did was painting the rockets, and to save money, the rockets were scratch built, many that were works of art.

I was doing STREAMS before people ever thought of STEM or STEAM. When doing a unit on geological time I had student groups cut out the bones of an unknown animal and attempt to reconstruct them and had many really creative 'creatures' they glued down on posters when they were happy with their attempt. None were ever correct and we had a lot of fun critiquing each of them and learning the names of different bones.

I then recreated at our school something that was called 'the Dino Dig' where I dug up during spring break a 4,000 sq. ft. weed area behind the school track and buried 6 life size simulated dinosaur skeletons that the students then set up a meter square grid pattern and excavated them. Having dug dino fossils as a volunteer for universities in Utah and New Mexico, I wanted it to be as realistic as possible. After most or all were dug up we cleared my classroom of desks and they tried reconstructing them on the floor.

We also did mousetrap powered cars but I required them to be scratch built instead of the usual kit cars the science vendors sell. Many of the students came up with designs that had great concepts but simply did not work when built. It didn't matter grade wise because if they could justify their reasoning and tried to get it to work they received full credit for that aspect of the assignment.

I mention these three because our school started the high desert art festival and schools from the area were bringing art work to display, our school had none. The art teacher asked me if I still had some of the science work I had my students do and I brought in the dino reconstruction posters I had on my walls and examples of rockets and mousetrap cars. That turned out to be the hit of the show!

Even in rocketry, there is art. A video production major needed to do a mini documentary for his final product and asked me if he could follow our Sugar Shot to Space project. During the course of the filming, he realized it was a long term project and changed to doing it on me. To help him out I agreed and when he finished it and I looked at it I thought I was watching something made up for my memorial service! Anyhow, he graduated and used it to get hired by NASA.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LydYQdaYwHA&list=FLgE9yxooDx1UwelAT7Xu7gQ&index=53

So yes, STEM is good, STEAM is better, but STREAMS is best. Science Technology, Remembrance (history), Engineering, Art, Math/Music, and Sports...that gets us back to teaching the way we used to, which was good enough to get us to the moon! The only problem I saw happening to education in the last 25 years that I was doing it was expectations were being lowered and that was what students were rising to.

I taught at what was classified as an economically disadvantaged area with predominantly minority students with English as a second language and yet my science students scored, on average, as good or better on national tests as students from exclusive affluent white schools rated as the top 100 in the country but I put in a lot of work for my students (usually 6am to 8pm).

One of the problems I saw was in many of my fellow teachers attitudes. For example, the last time I ate in the lunchroom was when I teacher loudly boasted he "will start teaching when they pay him more" I stood up and said do your students a favor and find a different job and I walked out. There are many teachers in education that are simply collecting a paycheck for 'babysitting'. I could good on and on but will stop before I get in trouble with any educators on the forum.

Well, after 'retiring' from paid teaching it wasn't long before I started volunteering to mentor student from around the world via the internet and formally from colleges and universities asking for my help. If you know aerospace (I'm a geologist), schools are always looking for volunteer mentors
to help students...and it's fun to do! Here's a student video of one of the last teams I helped:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NmTMBiBa_ag&list=FLgE9yxooDx1UwelAT7Xu7gQ&index=4

Rick

ps I had some high school students drop out of my rocketry program when we were told we couldn't make our own propellant anymore. Seems some students enjoyed that part of rocketry but it was deemed too dangerous...never mind I never had a student require even a bandaid in 20 years of building and launching rockets; when I asked them if they could say the same about their sports program they said "that's different, rockets are dangerous".


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